Autumn View Edition 4, 2019

A message from the chair

Thanks to the October 2019 election and the new minority government, Justin Trudeau has a golden opportunity to bring about some creative and mid to left of center legislation, for the betterment of himself his party and this country.

Any student of either history or politics can verify that some of the best legislation ever passed in Canadian Parliament came in times of minority government.

In the mid 1960’s a minority government under Liberal Prime Minister Lester Pearson and backed by the NDP, passed legislation that brought about our beloved Medicare, the Canadian Pension Plan and Federal funding for social assistance. It was at the time, and still is, a great step in helping low to middle class Canadians realize significant gains and improve their lot in life.

In 1972, when Pierre Trudeau’s Liberals were reduced to a minority they also seized the hot issue at the time, namely economic nationalism. With the backing of the NDP they established the Foreign Investment Review Agency. They also had NDP support in setting up Petro-Canada, a national oil company to confront the major foreign owned companies that dictated oil and gas policies. These popular moves at the time helped the Liberals get a majority win in the following election.

The question is, will Justin seize the similar situation that exists today and lead the way with NDP support, to bring about meaningful legislation on either/or Pharmacare or climate change, both of which are desperately needed and supported by most Canadians?    

Ed Faulknor, Chair
OPSEU Retired Members Division                   

A helping hand

How to handle a request for financial support

Many Canadians are grappling with debt as a result of soaring spending and a higher cost of living. A 2017 report by the Organization for Economic Co‑operation and Development showed that Canadian households are among the most indebted in the world1, and a recent survey by the Canadian Payroll Association suggested that nearly half of Canadian workers are living paycheque to paycheque2.

If a friend or family member is experiencing financial difficulties, it’s natural to want to help. It’s difficult to see someone in need but borrowing or lending between people who care about each other can present some risks and potentially impact the relationship in the long run. Careful handling of a request to provide financial support can prevent misunderstandings, conflict and financial mishaps.

Ask questions

There are many reasons why a person might ask for financial help, so the first thing to do is, as best as possible, try to understand the full context of the situation.

What are the details of the request – is it a loan of few hundred dollars or upwards of a couple thousand? What will the money be used for, and when and how will it be paid back? Is there a pattern of this family member or friend looking to borrow money from those around them? If so, this may indicate a bigger problem.

Explore alternatives

The information you gather can allow you to offer more valuable support than simply handing over money. If the individual is overwhelmed by unexpected expenses or debt, perhaps you can assist by helping to create a budget. If they’re unemployed, you may be able to help them brush up their resume or search for work. In some cases, it can be a great help to connect them with the right social or professional services in their community, such as social assistance agencies or employment programs.

You might also consider referring your friend or family member to your advisor to review their options. Your advisor will have the expertise and professional network to explore options for the individual that are specific to their situation and can help get them on the right path to a secure financial future.

Proceed with caution

If you do decide to provide financial support to a friend or family member, there are some things you can do to help avoid confusion or disagreements down the line.

Give a gift

If you can afford it, and you feel it fits the context of the relationship, you may want to simply provide a gift rather than a loan. This way, there are no expectations and no hard feelings. If the money is paid back, you can think of it as a bonus.

Put it in writing

Formalizing the details in a contract will help set expectations and show that you’re taking the loan and its terms seriously. It might feel awkward to ask for a contract, but it can help you avoid having to ask about repayment later. There are many standard loan agreements available online that can help you hash out the details – loan amount, interest rate (if any) and repayment schedule.

Think carefully before co‑signing

If your friend or family member can’t qualify for a loan from a financial institution on their own, they may ask you to co‑sign. A co‑signed loan can take on many forms – short‑term, long‑term, secured or unsecured. The need for a co‑signer means the lender considers the borrower to be a higher risk – either because they don’t have an established credit history or because their credit rating is not strong enough. It’s important to

understand that if the borrower defaults, you’re responsible for the balance of the loan. Also, co‑signing a loan could reduce the amount of money you may be able to borrow for your own purposes. If you decide to co‑sign a loan, it’s a good idea to monitor the account to make sure payments are being made on time.

Protect your own financial situation

Helping out someone whom you’re close with is a noble gesture, but the last thing you want to do is jeopardize your own financial health. If you’re taking the funds from your retirement savings, for example, you could increase your current tax burden and possibly affect the quality of your retirement. Before deciding, it’s a good idea to discuss the situation with your partner and ask your advisor about the potential impact on your own finances.

  1. http://www.macleans.ca/economy/congrats-canadians-youre-world-leaders-in-debt
  2. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/about-half-of-canadian-workers-living-paycheque-to-paycheque- survey/article36181891

NDP’s Horwath fights funding cuts and higher fees for long-term care

Changes revealed in government memos

OTTAWA — Two funding streams for long-term care are being eliminated by Doug Ford, taking millions of dollars away from care homes — but even as those cuts threaten to make life even less safe, healthy and dignified for seniors in care, the Ford government is hiking the fees residents pay by about $500 a year.

Official Opposition NDP Leader Andrea Horwath was in Ottawa Thursday, where she released government memos detailing the changes, and calling for a find-and-fix inquiry into long-term care to not only stop it from getting worse, but to actually make it better.

“For any of us with a loved one in long-term care, we know underfunding has real consequences,” said Horwath, speaking outside the Centre d’accueil Champlain long-term care home. “It means our loved one doesn’t always get the help they need to brush their teeth and get dressed in the morning. It means they could ring a call bell to get help to make it to the washroom, but be left waiting until it’s too late. And it means there are fewer staff to prevent falls, or even violence in long-term care homes.

“Cutting the funding to long-term care homes would take these problems from bad to worse.”

The memos from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care reveal that Ford is cancelling the High Wage Transition Fund, which helps pay for staff wages, and the Structural Compliance Premium fund, which helps keep long-term care homes up to modern standards. The two cuts amount to more than $34 million being ripped out of long-term care homes annually.

At the same time, Ford is raising the co-payment fees that long-term care residents pay by 2.3 per cent, which is one of the highest price hikes in the last decade. A middle class senior in care will pay about $500 more a year, as a result.

“Together, we can fight for care for our loved ones that’s dignified, that’s compassionate, and that’s safe. Seniors living in long-term care built our province and cared for us. We owe it to them to fight these cuts, and get to work building better long-term care in Ontario.”

The inquiry proposed by Horwath would look into the safety of residents and staff, funding, staffing levels, regulation, inspections, and more. For more than a year, she’s called for that inquiry to be a second phase of the Wettlaufer inquiry, which reported its recommendations Wednesday. Although the Wettlaufer inquiry’s mandate was specific to the conditions that failed to prevent a killer from attacking residents, Justice Eileen Gillese reported finding understaffing and underfunding, and called out systemic problems in long-term care that leave residents vulnerable.

Unite Against Racism

Equality is a core value of the labour movement. This is why we say, “an injury to one is an injury to all.” It is workers joining forces in solidarity that has won many of the benefits that are protected under the law today: the right to refuse unsafe work, the end of child labour, and for many workers, the weekend.

This year, the labour movement in Ontario is coming together under the theme Unite Against Racism.

Shamefully, many political leaders around the world are stoking the fires of hatred in order to strengthen their power. Where they should be blaming corporations and the super-rich for economic troubles, they put the blame on immigrants and racialized communities. And when these politicians gain more power, they push forward policies that hurt all workers.

Racist groups are emboldened by today’s political climate. According to an ongoing study by Dr. Barbara Perry, Dr. Ryan Scrivens and Dr. David Hofmann, Ontario is home to more than 30 right-wing extremist groups. Ontario is also regularly the province with the highest concentration of hate crime.

It’s time that we come together in solidarity to organize, educate, and resist the rise of racism. We must push back against electoral strategies designed to make us fight each other. Those strategies advance an agenda that hurts everyone.

In Ontario, we have seen the Conservative government cancel the $15 minimum wage and take away two paid sick days from workers across the province. The PC government continues to cut important public services such as health care and education that are essential for all Ontarians to thrive. Workers who are racialized, Indigenous, women, or who have a disability bear the brunt of these cuts.

The Conservative government has also made anti-immigrant cuts that specifically target racialized communities, such as ordering Legal Aid to stop providing legal representation to many migrants and refugees, an important service that many depend on.

Conservative cuts hurt Ontario workers and families, and with a federal election on the horizon, it is time for Ontarians to come together, demand a fair Canada for everyone and build an Ontario for all. We must stop the rise of hate, racism, xenophobia and Islamophobia; doing so is essential to ensuring rights for all of us.

The Ontario Federation of Labour’s Power of Many campaign continues to grow, bringing Ontarians together in the thousands to send a strong message to the politicians who are in government, and those seeking election, that tactics of division will not work on us.

This Labour Day, the Power of Many campaign continues its work for equality by joining with the Migrant Rights Network and Migrant Workers Alliance for Change in calling for an end to racism and hate. Together, we pledge to not let racism poison and divide our communities.

We demand justice and equality for all, strong public services, decent work, safe and healthy communities, and permanent resident status for all.

You can take action. Join the fight for equality. Visit powerofmany.ca to join a rapid response network in your community. Go to migrantrights.ca to sign a pledge and find resources that you can access to help your co-workers and community members unite against racism. You can find Unite Against Racism placards and banners to carry on Labour Day at migrantrights.ca/Sep2.

Together we can build an Ontario for all and a fair Canada for everyone.

Together we must #UniteAgainstRacism.

In solidarity,

CHRIS BUCKLEY

This article was taken from the Ontario Federation of Labour web site

 

 

November 26, 2019                     WITHOUT PREJUDICE

Sent via e-mail

Barry Brown, Co-Chair

Frank Ramagnano, Co-Chair

OMERS Sponsors Corporation

EY Tower / 900-100 Adelaide St. W.

Toronto, Ontario M5H 0E2

Dear Barry Brown and Frank Ramagnano,

As you are aware, the Board of the OMERS Sponsors Corporation (SC) held a meeting on November 14, 2019 to consider amending its foundational by-laws. OPSEU members distributed leaflets outside the meeting expressing our concerns around the proposed amendments. You responded by threatening to sue OPSEU for defamation.

Let me be absolutely clear: OPSEU did not engage in defamatory conduct. It is our duty as both a sponsor of OMERS and as the representative of thousands of OMERS plan members to advise you of our members’ concerns. This duty extends to expressing such concerns publicly so our members are aware that we are taking action on their behalf. Raising issue with the proposed amendments is also in the broader public interest, as the amendments affect the pension entitlements of ever-increasing numbers of public sector workers across Ontario.

In the past week, you and the SC Board have taken the following actions, among others, in a deeply procedurally unfair manner. You have eliminated the requirement for equal representation of Employer and Employee members on the Board; transferred the powers of the Board’s Co-Chairs to a single Chair with unilateral decision-making authority; and diluted the right of Sponsor Organizations to appoint or remove members of the Board. OPSEU members are rightly concerned about these actions and are fully within their right to express

Warren (Smokey) Thomas

President of OPSEU/SEFPO

cc:

Fred Hahn, President of CUPE

OMERS Sponsors Corporation Board Members

M. Rolland, CEO, OMERS Sponsors Corporation

G. Cooke, Chair, OMERS Administration Corporation

M. Latimer, CEO, OMERS Administration Corporation

Canada’s largest companies could easily eliminate pension deficits, but choose shareholder payouts instead: Report

AUGUST 29, 2019

OTTAWA—Canada’s largest publicly-traded companies could have eliminated their defined benefit (DB) pension deficits five times over with the value of what they chose to pay out to shareholders instead in 2017 alone, according to a new report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).

Put another way, these companies could have easily eliminated their pension deficits and still continued shareholder payouts.

The report updates research published by the CCPA in 2017, and compares the pension deficits of the roughly 90 companies on the S&P/TSX Composite Index with DB plans to shareholder payouts between 2011 and 2017. These company plans account for a large portion of all the country’s private DB assets.

”Year after year, companies are bringing in excess income, and year after year they decide to pay that out to shareholders instead of settling their pension obligations,” says CCPA Senior Economist David Macdonald, who co-authored the report with Chris Roberts, Social and Economic Policy Director with the Canadian Labour Congress.

“Shareholders are supposed to take on the firm’s risk. Instead, that risk is being shouldered by workers whose retirement security is compromised by outstanding pension deficits,” adds Macdonald.

Among the study’s findings:

  • In 2011, S&P/TSX companies with DB pensions paid twice as much to their shareholders as it would have cost to wipe out their pension deficits. By 2017, shareholders payouts ($66 billion) were over five times the value of their pension deficits ($12 billion);
  • Of the S&P/TSX companies with DB pension plans, two-thirds in any given year paid out more to shareholders than it would have cost to completely pay off their pension deficit;
  • Most of the 10 companies with the largest pension deficits pay out far more annually to shareholders than the value of a one-time payment to eliminate their pension liability;
  • Overall, pension deficits have shrunk since 2011, so it’s even easier to bring plans into solvency. But many companies are choosing not to.

“While requiring a minimal level of funding, Canada’s pension rules have left it to companies to decide whether to fully eliminate their pension deficit,” says Roberts. “Firms continue to push retirement risks onto workers in order to provide ever higher payouts to shareholders. It’s time for a new policy approach that considers firms’ financial strength rather than only focusing on the health of their pension plans.”

The report notes that enhancing public options for retirement security in the Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement is the simplest and most comprehensive way to ensure a comfortable retirement for all Canadians

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives 

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Passage of Bill 124 makes a constitutional challenge all but inevitable says the Ontario Federation of Labour

November 7, 2019

The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) is actively reviewing all options at their disposal, including legal action, against the PC’s Bill 124, Protecting a Sustainable Public Sector for Future Generations Act, which allows the government to impose salary and compensation caps, including for pension and health care improvements, on a variety of unionized and non-unionized public sector workplaces.

“Bill 124 is a direct attack on the collective bargaining rights of every worker in the province,” said Ontario Federation of Labour President Chris Buckley. “The OFL is committed to fight this Bill at every step, and we are reviewing all of our options – both political and legal – including the launch of a Charter challenge.”

“Now that the Bill has passed, I cannot imagine a scenario that does not result in a charter challenge,” said Buckley. “The agreements unions bargain on behalf of their members must be negotiated at the bargaining table, not in the legislature.”

The OFL argues that Bill 124 strips public sector workers of their constitutional rights to free and fair collective bargaining. It also forces front-line workers to accept compensation increases that fall far below the rate of inflation.

Among the workers affected by Bill 124 are those employed by crown agencies, school boards, universities and colleges, hospitals, non-profit long-term care homes, and children’s aid societies.

“Once again, the government has passed ill-conceived legislation that fails to reflect the realities of life for workers and in communities in Ontario. This Bill will leave workers, their families and communities without the services they depend on.”

The Ontario government spends the lowest amount per person on public services of any province in this country. In 2017, Ontario spent more than $2,000 less on programs per person than the rest of Canada on average. Public sector and private sector wage settlements in Ontario have been below inflation every year for the past ten years.

“Ontario does not have a spending problem, it has a revenue problem,” said Buckley. “Hard-working public sector workers, and the communities in which they live and work are being forced to make sacrifices so that the government can give away benefits to the wealthy. At the same time, the PCs ignore obvious sources of revenue. For instance, this government is giving $3.8 billion in tax breaks to corporations, has lost $3 billion by cancelling cap-and-trade, and has forfeited $275 million in taxes from high-income earners.”

The OFL represents 54 unions and one million workers in Ontario. For information, visit www.OFL.ca and follow @OFLabour on Facebook and Twitter.

-30-

For further information, please contact:
Meagan Perry 
Director of Communications, 
Ontario Federation of Labour
mperry@ofl.ca l 416-894-3456 

COPE 343

Tax scam

VANCOUVER — The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is warning the public of a recent scam involving email money transfers. It wants to remind the public the CRA will only send payments by direct deposit or by cheque, never by email money transfer.

There have been many reports of people receiving texts from an unknown number asking the user to click on a link to deposit their income tax return. Do not click on the link. There is also another version of the text message, telling people they need to unlock their account: 

The CRA says occasionally, taxpayers may receive, either by telephone, mail, or email, a communication that claims to be from the CRA but is not. In all these cases, the communication requests personal information, such as a social insurance, credit card, bank account, and passport numbers, from the taxpayer.

Canadian voters signal support for climate action

Polling shows that climate change was one of the key issues of the campaign.

Ottawa (04 Nov. 2019) — Climate change emerged as a top issue in last week’s federal election, as anticipated. Recent polling data confirms that many voters were influenced by the parties’ commitments on climate change, or lack thereof.

Environment, climate change are priorities for voters

Polling from Abacus Data has confirmed that climate change was one of the key issues of the campaign. Abacus Data asked voters to identify the top 5 issues that would have the greatest impact on their vote. Overall, the top issues were cost of living, access to health care, climate change and the environment, taxes, and poverty and inequality.

When comparing Liberal and NDP voters to Conservative voters, Abacus found that Liberal and NDP voters are 34% more likely than Conservative voters to rank climate change as a top issue.

Voters reject Conservative climate plan

Exit polling conducted by the University of Toronto’s Policy, Elections, and Representation lab, on behalf of Clean Prosperity, suggests voters were turned off by the Conservative climate platform.

This is what the survey found: “Of voters who did not vote for Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives, 20% said that they would consider voting Conservative—but 77% also said that climate change was among their top issues. Those same voters were unimpressed with the Conservative plan for climate change, giving it an average rating of D.”

Voters support action on climate change

Voters made clear their desire for climate action when they went to the polls on October 21. Groups like Climate Action Network Canada have observed that over two-thirds of voters cast their ballots for parties that put forward platforms that included climate action, including support for a carbon tax.

Although there may be debate within the new minority government regarding the details and direction of climate policy, voters nonetheless delivered a clear message in support of action on climate change.

Time to hold newly elected Parliament accountable

With a clear mandate from voters for action on climate change, we must hold the newly elected Parliament accountable to their climate commitments. We will be watching and maintaining pressure on the new government to ensure they take the urgent, transformational action on climate change that is required.

This article was taken from the NUPGE website

Angus Reid poll shows Canadians think Trudeau was wrong to break his electoral reform promise – support for PR is stronger than ever!

The results of our national poll, conducted in partnership with Angus Reid Global, are in – and they are amazing.

When Justin Trudeau broke his election promise to end first-past-the-post and make every vote count, he claimed that “there is no consensus” and that “only a few people” wanted proportional representation. Just before breaking his promise, he suggested that Canadians see less need for electoral reform since the Liberals had formed the government.

Today’s poll proves—again—that Trudeau is indulging in wishful thinking on electoral reform. The appetite for proportional representation in Canada is stronger than ever!

The Angus Reid survey of 1510 Canadians found:

77% support moving towards a system of proportional representation in Canadian elections. This even included 80% of those who voted Liberal in the last federal election, and 65% of those who voted Conservative.

82% agree that “In order for a political party to form a “majority government,” it should have the support of over 50% of Canadians.”

90% agree that “An electoral system should encourage parties to cooperate and compromise so that the important policies that are passed in parliament reflect the support of over 50% of Canadians.”

80% feel that the overall composition of Parliament should be an accurate reflection of how people voted.

When Trudeau broke his promise, he told a town hall, “It was my choice to make.”

Canadians disagree with that choice.

The survey found that 70% of Canadians disapprove of Trudeau’s decision.

The Liberal Party’s 2015 platform specifically mentioned proportional representation as an option. The party pledged to listen to Canadians and experts. Although 88% of the experts and 87% of the citizens who testified to the federal electoral reform committee recommended PR, Trudeau said no.

Today’s Angus Reid poll makes clear: 39% majorities are not working for Canadians.

Canadians are looking for parties to cooperate in Parliament to tackle huge issues, like the climate crisis.

In 2015, many Canadians voted for the game-changing promise of electoral reform – particularly those who voted strategically for the Liberals.

Sharon Sommerville, an organizer for the strategic voting campaign to elect a Liberal in her riding, told us she can’t count the number of times she heard at the door, “I’m just doing this once because I’ll never have to do it again.”

Sincerely,

Anita Nickerson

Executive Director, Fair Vote Canada

Fair Vote Canada

88 North Drive

Kitchener, ON N2M 1K8

Canada

With Mixed Member Proportional representation, the results for 2019 Federal Election *-would have been:

Con 116, Lib   112, NDP 54, Bloc 26, Green 24, PPC 6

New report reveals major gaps in care for Canadians with IPF

December, 2019

The current state of care for Canadians living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is in great need of meaningful change to alleviate the considerable burdens associated with the condition, according to a newly released report, The Burden of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis in Canada.

The prevalence of IPF is higher in Canada than in many other developed countries and leads to the death of 5,000 Canadians each year.

Developed in collaboration with CPFF and Hoffmann-La Roche Limited, with input and guidance from a committee of IPF experts, The Burden of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis in Canada shows there is a lack of understanding of the disease even amongst physicians, which leads to delayed diagnoses and major gaps and disparities in the quality and access to healthcare resources. The report reveals the drastic differences in these resources from province to province, and the significant economic impact on both patients and the healthcare system.

The report outlines workable solutions – some which can be implemented right away – that could contribute to alleviating the current burdens of IPF. Here are some highlights of the recommendations, which are discussed in greater detail in the report:

  • Improved education and awareness of IPF: for the public, patients, caregivers and health care professionals, particularly respirologists and general practitioners.
  • Joint treatment management strategies:  having these in place between community care and academic centers for individual cases will ensure that patients around the country have the opportunity to receive the best possible care, no matter where they are primarily treated.
  • Earlier integration of multidisciplinary palliative care: this will result in reduced health care use in the last year of life and more home deaths. In addition, conversations around advanced care planning helps support partners to understand and learn about a patient’s goals and wishes and to feel more informed and supported.
  • Expanded access to patient and support partner resources: access to patient and support partner peer support groups, patient empowerment resources, as well as palliative care, are critical to maintaining quality of life for patients and their loved ones. Digital access to such programs would lower barriers and broaden availability.
  • Equality of care across provinces: quality of care should not be determined by where you live. To ensure quality of care throughout Canada, progressive health care decisions and dedication of resources to IPF treatment need to be established everywhere.

Autumn View Edition 3, 2020

A message from the chair

Canada needs a single payer universal prescription drug plan. In doing so we will have cheaper drugs, drugs that are affordable and better control over their distribution.

Canada is the only developed country in the world with universal health care that doesn’t include universal drug coverage. This despite a multitude of studies and commissions dating back to at least 1964 that actually recommended Pharma Care. The reason for this failure falls directly on the shoulders of the politicians who bow to the pressure from the big drug companies.

In March 2018 the federal budget committed to implement a plan for Pharma Care but here it is the fall of 2019 and we still have nothing but promises.

Too many Canadians can’t afford their necessary drugs and so cut pills in half or go without because of their huge costs. Countries that do have Pharma Care in some variation have proven it saves money and saves lives.

Our current piecemeal system to cover drug costs is determined not by need but by how much money you have, where you live and where you work. The powers that be, appear incapable of opposing the pharmaceutical company’s pressure to maintain high costs and they ignore their apparent lack of caring for safe and appropriate use. The Opioid problem of today is a perfect example.

We must change the mind set of the politicians in power and have them acquiesce to the people, instead of the large and often multinational drug companies.

Ed Faulknor, Chair
OPSEU Retired Members Division                   

Critical Illness

Some Interesting tidbits of info:

Major Reasons for Mortgage Foreclosures:

  • 3% due to death
  • 20% due to bankruptcy
  • 47% due to major illness

Canada has the 2nd highest rate of Breast Cancer in the World.

Smoking & obesity are related to 67% of cancer.

More than 50% of people diagnosed with common cancers will survive 5 years or longer.

The Canadian Cancer Society estimated that 67% of costs related to cancer treatment come from indirect expenses not covered by provincial health plans.

The Prairie Provinces have a higher number of MS incidents than the rest of Canada.

People are living longer, often with a life-threatening illness. Hence, creating financial hardship for the survivor and family.

Michael J. Fox was diagnosed with Parkinson’s at age 30. Parkinson’s destroys dopamine in the brain, a chemical that controls motor functions.

Christopher Reeves became paralyzed from the neck down at age 43. He declared personal bankruptcy due to the high costs of his injury.

Our life expectancy has almost doubled since 1900. The #1 & #2 killers in 1900 were Pneumonia and Tuberculosis and in 1998 they were Heart Disease and Cancer

What is critical illness Insurance Anyway?

Pays a lump sum benefit (regardless of other insurance) upon diagnosis of a covered critical condition.

Only based medical diagnosis of the condition–­ not related to inability to work.

Most policies indicate the insured must survive 30 days after the diagnosis.

Examples of covered conditions include:  Heart Attack,  Life Threatening Cancer,  Stroke,  Multiple Sclerosis,  Kidney Failure,  Paralysis, Coma,  Coronary Artery Bypass, Loss of Limbs,  speech,  hearing, sight,  Major Organ transplant,  Parkinson’s & Alzheimer’s Disease,  Severe Burns.

Sharks apparently are the only animals that never get sick. As far as is known, they are immune to every known disease including cancer.

If one person in your family has a heart disease, the chances of you having heart disease increases by 204%.

If two people in your family have breast cancer, your chances of getting cancer goes up by 400%.

Viresh Mathur Ph. 416-822-4783 Email: viresh@blueumbrellafinancial.ca 

Region 7 Retirees

Region 7 Retirees Coffee, Cards and Conversation event is held the first Thursday of every month, except December as our Luncheon is that day. It’s at the OPSEU Membership Center in Thunder Bay, 326 Memorial Ave between Tim Hortons and Merle Mae from 1-4 pm.

Bring a friend, bring your spouse, they don’t have to be OPSEU members. LTTIPers also welcome. There’s no agenda other than to get together and socialize. Coffee, tea and snacks are provided. Maybe even prizes.

Upcoming dates:

  • January 2, 2020
  • February 6, 2020
  • March 5, 2020

Note – Retirees Christmas Luncheon is Thursday December 5th, you should get an invitation from OPSEU, if you don’t, email me at 13sasnider@gmail.com or call me at 807-630-4751. As this is a catered event rsvping will be important to ensure there is enough food plus people’s dietary accommodations are met.

Government of Canada

Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a serious disorder that causes your breathing to stop repeatedly while you sleep. These breathing pauses or “apneas” usually last 10 to 30 seconds and can happen many times throughout the night.

The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, which happens when the upper airway gets blocked during sleep. Often, the blockage happens when the soft tissue in the back of the throat collapses and closes during sleep. Relaxed throat muscles, a narrow airway, a large tongue or extra fatty tissue in the throat can also block the airway. Central apnea and mixed apnea are other types of sleep apnea, but are more rare.

Signs and symptoms of sleep apnea

Family members or bed partners often pick up on the signs of sleep apnea first. Many people with sleep apnea don’t know they’re snoring and gasping for breath at night. If you have any of the following signs, see your doctor:

  • daytime sleepiness
  • loud snoring followed by silent pauses
  • gasping or choking during sleep
  • morning headache
  • irritability or mood changes
  • poor concentration or memory loss
  • lowered sex drive
  • falling asleep while driving

Fast Facts from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey – Sleep Apnea Rapid Response

Snoring by itself doesn’t necessarily mean that you have sleep apnea. It is true that loud snoring is common in people with this disorder, but there’s a big difference between simple snoring and sleep apnea.

Untreated sleep apnea can cause serious health problems. If it’s not treated, sleep apnea can lead to:

  • high blood pressure
  • stroke
  • heart attack
  • motor vehicle collisions
  • depression
  • decreased sexual function
  • work-related injuries

Treatment

There are easy and effective treatments for sleep apnea. Your treatment will depend on whether your sleep apnea is mild, moderate or severe. Your doctor can help you choose the best treatment for you. The most common treatment for sleep apnea is CPAP or continuous positive airway pressure. CPAP involves wearing a special mask that keeps the throat open and stops the snoring and pauses in breathing.

The key is to confirm whether you have sleep apnea so you can start treatment. If you have any of the signs and symptoms listed above, see your doctor. Your doctor may send you for overnight testing at a sleep disorder centre where your condition can be studied thoroughly. You may also be required to do some home tests.

Lifestyle changes – like losing weight and exercising – can reduce sleep apnea symptoms and can also help reduce other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. If you have mild sleep apnea, some lifestyle changes may get rid of the symptoms altogether. Here are some of the things you can do:

Lose weight

Being overweight is a risk factor for sleep apnea. If you’re overweight, ask your doctor for advice on how to lose weight safely. Weight loss of just 10 per cent – that’s equal to 20 lbs for a 200 lbs man – can greatly reduce the number of sleep apnea episodes that happen each night.

Get moving

Exercise isn’t just a great way to maintain a healthy body weight, but also contributes to healthy sleep. (Try not to exercise for at least three hours before bedtime. A hard work out right before bed might actually cause trouble sleeping.)

Stop smoking

Smoking can make sleep apnea symptoms worse because it can irritate your throat and make you cough at night. Stopping smoking will also give you more energy for everyday physical activities.

Stick to a regular sleep schedule

Going to bed and waking up at roughly the same times every day helps you to get the right kind of sleep. You need to experience the full cycle of deep- and lighter-stage sleep to feel well rested. A regular sleeping schedule also prevents you from getting overtired, which can make sleep apnea symptoms worse.

Avoid alcohol and sleeping pills

If you have trouble sleeping, try a cup of decaffeinated herbal tea or juice instead of unwinding with a glass of wine. Alcohol and certain medications (sleeping pills and some pain medications) can make throat muscles relax more than normal. As a result, airways can get blocked. Alcohol and medications can also make it harder for your brain to “wake up” and register a lack of oxygen in the body. This can cause longer and more serious pauses in breathing. If you find it hard to fall asleep, try reading a book or taking a warm bath.

Sleep on your side

Sleeping on one side instead of sleeping on your back can help to improve sleep apnea symptoms. Sleeping on your back lets gravity pull on the tissues at the back of your throat and neck. This can cause the upper airway to become narrow or collapse completely. You can “train” yourself to sleep on your side by:

  • putting pillows against your back to prop yourself on your side.
  • using the ‘tennis ball trick’. Sew a pocket onto the back of your pajama top and put a tennis ball in it. If you start to roll to your back during sleep, the pressure from the ball will make you roll back to your side.

Trivia Questions

  1. The beaver is the national emblem of which country?
  2. Which singer’s real name is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta?
  3. The average human body contains how many pints of blood?
  4. Which US state is nearest to the old Soviet Union?
  5. In which city is Jim Morrison buried?
  6. Which is the highest waterfall in the world?

Answers on last page Autumn View

A Journey of 1,000 Miles Begins with the Current Step, not the Next One

As a culture, we tend to be obsessed over the next step.  But how often do we hear people talking about the current one? My guess is not a lot, even though we have to take the current step before taking the next one. So let me tell you a story.

I used to ride my bicycle a lot on roads in the American West. I was obsessed, and I was even pretty decent at it. My friends and I used to do a long race from Logan, Utah, over three mountain passes to Jackson, Wyo. It was just over 200 miles, and we used to do it in 10 to 12 hours.

One year, the night before the race, I got wretchedly sick and was throwing up all night. By morning, it was clear I could not ride the whole way. But the thing about these races is that they’re team events. One of the ways you can help the team is simply ride in the front of your pack and bear the brunt of the wind so your teammates can draft off you and save energy.

There was a spot about 30 miles into the race where I knew I could exit the course, so I decided to make it just that far and use all my energy helping my teammates for that stretch.

Even 30 miles sounded like an awful lot to me that morning. But I had a coach who had been training me leading up to the race, and he was always trying to get me to focus only on the current breath.

The inhalation going in right now. The exhalation going out right now.

Then, we’d translate that way of thinking to the pedal stroke. He taught me how to ride one stroke at a time — how to focus on the current stroke.

I had no aspirations of finishing the race. I had no focus on the end goal. Instead, I just did what my coach taught me and rode completely focused on the current moment. All of a sudden, I looked up and noticed that I was at the 30-mile mark. I was feeling pretty good, so I decided not to quit.

“I’ll just go to the next break,” I thought.

As you may have guessed, I didn’t get off at the next break, either. Or the next one. Or the one after that. I just kept going, one stroke at a time, until the race was over. In the end, somehow, it ended up being my best-ever performance in that race.

Was it a fluke? A freak accident? Or maybe, just maybe, was there something to what my coach had taught me?

If I had focused on the next steps — and crossing the finish line for my fastest time ever — I never would have started the race in the first place. But when I focused on the process at the most basic level, everything clicked.

Of course, this isn’t just a biking story. This could apply to business, a relationship, a big project. It doesn’t matter what we’re talking about, because one fact is always the same.

The current step comes first. You have to focus here before you focus there.

This article was written by Carl Richards for the New York Times and was sent to AV by Leony deGraaf Hastings of deGraaf Financial Strategies. leony@dgfs.ca

Why Canada could be a good hedge for investors believing a global recession looms

Heightened recession fears amid lingering U.S.-China trade tensions and disappointing data have led to another round of bond yield declines and fuelled expectations of further central bank easing globally, including by the Bank of Canada.

But we believe Canada could outperform other developed economies amid a slowing global expansion. Canada could also continue to beat economists’ expectations about domestic growth, which should prevent the Bank of Canada from following in the footsteps of the Federal Reserve with a rate cut this year.

In fact, Canada could prove to be a good hedge for investors believing a global recession is coming.

DIVERGING MOMENTUM

We see diverging momentum over the next 12 months, with U.S. GDP growth slowing while Canadian GDP growth is more likely to pick from current levels.

Earnings momentum in Canada has outpaced the U.S. and most other developed markets over the last nine months. Over the next 12 months, a stable U.S. economy and the lagged effects of the weaker loonie will help support the Canadian economy and earnings.

Canada has been relatively unscathed by the trade war because of our smaller manufacturing sector than most major economies such as the U.S., China, Japan, Germany and Italy, several of them facing troubles of their own, including Germany, where the economy contracted in the second quarter and the auto sector is struggling.

Canada has also been among countries, alongside the U.S. and Australia, to register manufacturing PMIs above 50, signaling growth.

BEATING EXPECTATIONS

Not only has the Canadian economy showed resilience relative to most major countries, but it has performed better than economists’ expectations: the Citigroup Economic Surprise Index for Canada has had a positive reading all year, while the global index has been negative since the second quarter 2018.

Going forward, Canada could continue to surprise as we believe housing risks are overstated, while oil isn’t having the drag on the economy that most analysts expect.

In the oil sector, headwinds will persist until transportation issues are resolved, and investment will be further restrained as energy companies struggle to access credit markets. However, even with these challenges, the rest of the Canadian economy has been able to pick up the slack.

NO HOUSING BUBBLE IN CANADA

On the housing front, data don’t signal any bubble. House price increases in Canada, Toronto and Vancouver in particular, have been supported by a lack of supply. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation also estimates that housing market vulnerability is now moderate in Canada, following 10 quarters of high vulnerability. Most notably, Vancouver is now moderate after three years of high vulnerability.

While we don’t expect a recession in Canada, it would be the biggest threat to the housing sector through the unemployment channel that would affect households’ ability to repay their mortgages.

We believe concerns over Canada’s high amount of household debt and the ability to repay it are exaggerated: the unemployment rate remains near its record low despite its increase to 5.7% in July, while interest rates are likely to decline further, and wage gains over the past year have kept pace with housing price increases.

GLOBAL RECESSION RISK INCREASES BUT NOT THE BASE CASE SCENARIO

Overall, while the risk of a recession has increased, we still believe the Canadian economy will continue to grow.

Our recession indicators have picked up recently, as the recent revisions to U.S. GDP have highlighted weaker investment and declining corporate profitability. However, the sharp decline in bond yields globally, across the curve, should diminish recession risks by supporting economic growth.

If a recession were to occur in the U.S. or on a more global scale, all bets would be off for the Canadian economy. Yet, it would hold up better relative to Japan, the euro zone, and the U.K., which have been hit harder than Canada by the trade war and idiosyncratic risks.

As a defensive stock market, Canada would hold up better than other major developed countries. The U.S. being Canada’s largest export market, the likely depreciation of the loonie against the greenback in a recession scenario would mitigate the impact of weaker economic activity. This all means that the Canadian market would be a good hedge if you think we’re headed for a global recession.

Still, before moving to an overweight in Canadian equities from our current neutral position, we will wait for confirmation from data that the Canadian economy will pick up. In the meantime, we prefer to take exposure via the currency and remain long the Canadian dollar.

Rachael Moir is a Quantitative Investment Analyst with the Investment Management and Strategy team at MD Financial Management. She is responsible for supporting strategic and tactical asset allocation and alternative investment mandates.

This Globe and Mail article was legally licensed by AdvisorStream and was provided by Leony deGraaf Certified Financial Adviser at deGraaf Financial Strategies 1-800- 775-7047 www.dgfs.ca

NDP fighting Ford’s cuts to Seniors care

Villa Colombo Toronto facing staff layoffs and higher fees

TORONTO — Doug Ford’s cuts to long-term care are taking away millions of dollars from homes across the province, and in Toronto, that will mean residents of Villa Colombo Toronto will see staff layoffs and higher fees.

Official Opposition NDP critic for Long-Term Care, Teresa Armstrong, held a press conference at Villa Colombo Toronto on Friday, joined by families of residents who called on the Ford government to stop the cuts. Armstrong addressed government memos, proposing the elimination of two long-term care funding streams, and called for a find-and-fix inquiry into long-term care.

“Families in Ontario are already concerned about the level of care their loved ones are receiving after years of Liberal underfunding of long-term care,” said Armstrong. “Doug Ford’s planned cuts will just make matters worse.”

At Villa Colombo Toronto, Ford’s cuts mean a loss of $122,361 in 2019 and $489,444 in 2020. Jobs will be lost, and residents will get even less hands-on care and support.

The cuts scheduled for Oct. 1 include the elimination of funding to help with staff wages and money for older homes to do necessary maintenance and repairs.

“Villa Colombo needs more staff, not less, to meet the needs of my mother and other residents,” said Julie Perl, Chair of the Family Council at the home. “If these cuts go ahead, the loss of support our parents get every day will be devastating for them, for all of us who love them, and for the health care workers who are trying their best.”

“It’s hard enough for the current staff to give residents the care they need,” said Nick and Anna Lo Iacono, who have a loved one at Villa Colombo. “But it will be impossible once staff are let go because of this government’s funding cuts.”

At the same time, Ford is raising the co-payment fees that long-term care residents pay by 2.3 per cent, which is one of the highest price hikes in the last decade. A middle class senior in care will pay about $500 more a year, as a result.

“Residents here at Villa Colombo and across Ontario deserve better than this. They raised our families, they built our province, and they cared for us,” said Armstrong. “New Democrats will fight these cuts — we don’t want seniors care dragged backwards, we want even better care for our loved ones.”

The NDP has called for a find-and-fix inquiry, which would look into the safety of residents and staff, funding, staffing levels, regulation, inspections, and more. For more than a year, the NDP has called for that inquiry to be a second phase of the Wettlaufer inquiry, which reported its recommendations Wednesday. Although the Wettlaufer inquiry’s mandate was specific to the conditions that failed to prevent a killer from attacking residents, Justice Eileen Gillese reported findings of understaffing and underfunding, and called out systemic problems in long-term care that leave residents vulnerable.

Stop sacrificing your retirement to coddle your adult children.

Half of American parents are risking their retirement savings to help support adult children, according to a recent survey.

A poll conducted by Bankrate.com asked parents: Would you say you have sacrificed or are sacrificing your retirement savings to help your adult children financially?

Fifty-one percent of respondents said, yes, they were jeopardizing their retirement security a lot or somewhat. Parents said they were paying, among other expenses, cellphone bills, car insurance premiums and housing costs.

Higher-earning parents were more likely to provide financial assistance compared with lower-earning parents. Sixty-one percent of parents making more than $80,000 per year said they were sacrificing their retirement to help support children 18 and older with their bills, while 54 percent of parents earning $40,000 to $80,000 said they are paying bills for their grown children.

“I think some parents are caught between the proverbial rock and a hard place when it comes to sending their children on their way, financially speaking,” said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst for Bankrate.com. “For some, it is because they see no other good alternatives, or they are unwilling to press the point, such as essentially kicking their children out or being more forceful in, say, divorcing them from the Netflix account.”

Pulling back financial support can be difficult when your adult child is starting out and struggling under the weight of student loans and high housing costs. But coddling them too long at the expense of your retirement security will eventually shift the financial burden to your children, who may not be able to handle the burden of your care.

“In some cases, for the parents, they are likely either failing to do their own homework to know how much money they will require in retirement, in denial, or overly optimistic how they will make up for it on the other side, perhaps by working part-time later,” Hamrick said.

I’m not opposed to extending parental resources to help them pay off debt or ease the financial burden on adult children who are trying to establish themselves.

“I don’t think it is exclusively a financial issue,” Hamrick said. “I think there are a variety of threads attached to the emotionally charged nature of their relationships. Because of the modern nature of more closely tied psychologically boomer parents and their adult children, some are willing to pay a price to keep them close to home.”

I’ve seen this first hand. Parents cannot let go financially for fear their children will struggle too much. Or they cling too long, enabling irresponsible adult children. The financial umbilical cord has to be cut or you are going to end up with an overindulged adult still treating you like his or her personal ATM.

Read: Should parents pay off $200,000 in law school loans for a son who ended up in rehab?

The question of sacrificing your retirement savings to help support an adult child reminds me of the instructions the flight attendants give just before takeoff.

Flight attendants instruct passengers to put on their oxygen masks first, even if traveling with a child — or someone acting like a child. As parents, we have to think of our financial life as an oxygen mask.

Why?

You have to fasten your mask first because if you’re gasping for air and pass out, you cannot help yourself or your child.

If you have enough saved for retirement and to assist an adult child who is doing his or her best to launch, that’s fine. But if you aren’t saving for retirement or investing enough, put your mask on first.

Secure your retirement first.

This article was written by Michelle Singletary from The Washington Post and was forwarded to Autumn View by Leony deGraaf Hastings – leony@dgfs.ca

Canada Doing the Worst Among G7 in Fight Against Climate Change: Report

The country’s climate plan isn’t enough, and the entire G7 needs to do more.

OTTAWA — The wealthiest countries in the world — including Canada — are lagging instead of leading in the fight against global warming, a new report says.

The Climate Action Network, a global association of more than 1,300 climate groups, issued a report card on the climate plans of the G7 nations ahead of the leaders’ summit in France this weekend. The groups hope to pressure the world’s wealthiest nations to step up their climate game, noting none of them is doing enough.

There is also a hope expressed in the report that the upcoming federal election in Canada might stimulate more ambitious action. Canada, the report says, is among the worst of the already bad G7 bunch.

Watch: France’s president calls for action following fires in the Amazon.

“It’s depressing,” said Catherine Abreu, executive director of Climate Action Network Canada. “The richest countries in the world are delivering the poorest performance and some of the smallest and poorest are leading the way.”

The report card says Canada’s current policies are consistent with global warming exceeding 4 C compared to pre-industrial levels, more than twice the stated goal of the Paris agreement of staying as close to 1.5 C as possible. The United States and Japan are also both in the 4 C category, while the other four G7 members, France, Italy, Germany and the United Kingdom, have policies consistent with more than 3 C in warming.

A spokeswoman for Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Canada is leading internationally with its initiative to wean the world off coal power, and financing projects in developing nations to mitigate or adapt to climate change.

“Over the past three and a half years, our government has delivered on an ambitious, affordable plan that is doing more to cut carbon pollution than any other federal government in Canada’s history,” Sabrina Kim said in a written statement.

But the Climate Action Network ranks Canada’s climate plan as having the same impact on global warming as the policies of the United States, where President Donald Trump has rejected the Paris agreement.

The report applauds Canada’s plan to eliminate coal as a source of electricity by 2030, the national price on pollution and the goal to stop selling combustion-engine cars by 2040. But it says all of the government plans “remain insufficient to meet Canada’s targets and the Paris Agreement.”

Watch: Canada is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world. Story continues below.

Canada’s current targets were developed by the Conservatives in the spring of 2015, and maintained by the Liberals six months later when they signed on to the Paris agreement a few weeks after winning the election. The goal by 2030 is to cut emissions 30 per cent below what they were in 2005.

Last December, the Liberals said computer modelling suggested Canada will get just over halfway there — 16 per cent below 2005 levels — under current plans.

Many scientists also say Canada must cut more than twice as many emissions than planned if it is to pull its weight in the war on climate change.

Climate plans are proving to be a major part of most party platforms, with the NDP, Green and Conservatives already releasing at least the broad strokes of their environment promises. The Liberals are expected to release their climate platform next month.

McKenna has said several times that Canada will increase its emissions targets in 2020, when the Paris agreement requires it, but she hasn’t indicated how much more she will aim to cut.

The Conservative plan doesn’t specifically put a number on the goal, but does describe itself as “Canada’s best chance to meet the Paris targets.” The NDP aim to increase emissions cuts in line with what scientists demand. The Green Party promises to cut emissions by 2030 to 60 per cent below 2005 levels.

This article was taken from the UFCW Politics Now publication

“It’s depressing,” said Catherine Abreu, executive director of Climate Action Network Canada. “The richest countries in the world are delivering the poorest performance and some of the smallest and poorest are leading the way.”

The report card says Canada’s current policies are consistent with global warming exceeding 4 C compared to pre-industrial levels, more than twice the stated goal of the Paris agreement of staying as close to 1.5 C as possible. The United States and Japan are also both in the 4 C category, while the other four G7 members, France, Italy, Germany and the United Kingdom, have policies consistent with more than 3 C in warming.

A spokeswoman for Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Canada is leading internationally with its initiative to wean the world off coal power, and financing projects in developing nations to mitigate or adapt to climate change.

“Over the past three and a half years, our government has delivered on an ambitious, affordable plan that is doing more to cut carbon pollution than any other federal government in Canada’s history,” Sabrina Kim said in a written statement.

But the Climate Action Network ranks Canada’s climate plan as having the same impact on global warming as the policies of the United States, where President Donald Trump has rejected the Paris agreement.

The report applauds Canada’s plan to eliminate coal as a source of electricity by 2030, the national price on pollution and the goal to stop selling combustion-engine cars by 2040. But it says all of the government plans “remain insufficient to meet Canada’s targets and the Paris Agreement.”

Watch: Canada is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world. Story continues below.

Canada’s current targets were developed by the Conservatives in the spring of 2015, and maintained by the Liberals six months later when they signed on to the Paris agreement a few weeks after winning the election. The goal by 2030 is to cut emissions 30 per cent below what they were in 2005.

Last December, the Liberals said computer modelling suggested Canada will get just over halfway there — 16 per cent below 2005 levels — under current plans.

Many scientists also say Canada must cut more than twice as many emissions than planned if it is to pull its weight in the war on climate change.

Climate plans are proving to be a major part of most party platforms, with the NDP, Green and Conservatives already releasing at least the broad strokes of their environment promises. The Liberals are expected to release their climate platform next month.

McKenna has said several times that Canada will increase its emissions targets in 2020, when the Paris agreement requires it, but she hasn’t indicated how much more she will aim to cut.

The Conservative plan doesn’t specifically put a number on the goal, but does describe itself as “Canada’s best chance to meet the Paris targets.” The NDP aim to increase emissions cuts in line with what scientists demand. The Green Party promises to cut emissions by 2030 to 60 per cent below 2005 levels.

This article was taken from the UFCW Politics Now publication

How Successful Hospital to Home Transitions Can Reduce Readmission

Posted on October 13, 2017

Gina Roberts-Grey

VIEW BIO

For more than 17 years, Gina Roberts-Grey has pored over studies and interviewed leading health experts on topics ranging from healthy longevity, aging, and caregiving to dementia, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Her work has been featured in publications like Woman’s Day, AARP, Oprah, Neurology Now and many more.

8 simple steps to ensuring a smooth transition home from the hospital and reducing the chances of readmission

Readmission to the hospital is a growing problem for America’s healthcare system. Data analyzed by Medicare says about 20 percent of the 35 million patients discharged from the U.S. health system return to the hospital within the 30 days 1.

Not having a strong and well-understood hospital to home care plan is one of the leading reasons patients find themselves returning to the hospital within days or weeks of discharge, and there are many easy-to-implement steps that can help prevent readmission.

Here are eight simple steps to preventing readmission for you or a loved one:

Geek out

Technology isn’t just for posting photos of your grandkids or watching a favorite show. Everything from in-home sensors, smart phone apps, remote monitoring and more are assisting and promoting patient care and engagement. A recent Mayo Clinic study says mobile and in-home devices have led to a 40 percent decrease in hospital readmission for cardiac rehabilitation patients (who are among the largest group readmitted) 2.

Before leaving the hospital, ask if utilizing technology to record, monitor and report daily healthcare data and activities should be part of your hospital to home care plan.

Communicate

Miscommunication is responsible for about one-quarter of all readmissions, says a 2016 study published in JAMA Internal Medicine 3. “Asking questions is the easiest way to foster clear and concise communication,” says Katie Goodman, MSSA, LSW, a social worker at Marcus Pavilion /Menorah Park, a skilled nursing facility in Beachwood, Ohio

“There are no ‘silly’ questions and neither patients, nor their family members, should ever hesitate posing any question to the physician, treatment coordinator, discharge nurse, etc.”

Goodman suggests asking questions about recommendations for home care needs, the need for skilled nursing or skilled therapy, the degree of help recommended for activities of daily living and where you can hire help. “You can also ask about any specialized equipment needed, a home exercise therapy program, can your loved one be alone and so on.”

Not sure who to ask? Goodman says “one good resource is the social worker or case manager in the facility or hospital, who answer questions constantly throughout the day.”

Think beyond medical care

Too often patients and their loved ones attempt to shoulder the responsibility of transitioning home from the hospital on their own. However, building a connected care circle to rely on helps provide ongoing education, support and care oversight that increases patient outcomes and helps to prevent hospital readmission.

Before leaving the hospital, inquire about community support like Meal on Wheels programs or visiting clergy, as well as health services like physical therapy and/or follow-up visits to a physician or specialist. Goodman says utilizing such services can enhance a patient’s overall health and well-being, to lessen the chance of hospital readmission.

Manage medication

An analysis by the American Geriatrics Society says educating patients and their families prior to discharge cuts the chance of readmission by 25 percent 4. This includes brushing up on dosing and timing of all medications—including any newly added to a treatment plan during the trip to the hospital.

Amelia Roberts, BSN, RN, a registered nurse care coordinator in Washington D.C., says at-home medication errors is a huge problem. “Medication errors at home can send people back to the hospital. Sometime people get home with new medications and are unsure what to do with the old medications they still have at home. They may still take the old medicine which can have an adverse reaction or not taking the new/correct medication properly.”

Roberts suggests asking for a detailed and written medication plan patients and their family or advocate can refer to in the event at-home questions arise. “Make sure it indicates what—if anything—to do with other medicines the person was taking to avoid any confusion.”

Follow up

Before leaving the hospital, schedule and required follow-up appointments with a primary physician or required specialists within 10 days of discharge.

This step can slip through the cracks once a person is home and settling in. But it’s an important part of the hospital to home care plan that can help prevent readmission. The follow-up visit is a time to review medication adherence, side effects, etc., as well as physical therapy progress or wound/incision healing. It’s also a chance to ask questions that may help prevent confusion or complications that lead to readmission.

Fill the fridge

Having access to fresh food that complies with a person’s discharge plan is essential. Proper nutrition can aid the healing process post-surgery, help boost or sustain energy to successfully participate in physical therapy and even help adherence to medication that need to be taken with food to prevent nausea or maximize absorption.

Keep an eye on exercise

Goodman says another leading cause of returning to the hospital or skilled nursing facility is patients not maintaining the recommended exercise programs assigned by their physical therapist.

“The best we can do is ensure patients and their caregivers are educated on the importance of keeping up with exercise,” she explains. That includes having a written home exercise program with pictures on how to do the exercise.

“Patients should be set up with home care which includes a nurse and therapist visiting in their home setting and checking up regularly to insure exercising is occurring as prescribed.”

Speak up

Goodman stresses that no matter the circumstance, question or issue, the easiest way to ensure a smooth hospital to home transition is using your voice. “Never hesitate asking a question, explaining a concern or bringing up a change in your symptoms, care needs or ability to comply with recommended treatments. In many instances, that can be how to prevent hospital readmission.”

 Sources:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK91986/
  2. http://www.mobihealthnews.com/31580/mayo-clinic-study-finds-app-reduces-cardiac-readmissions-by-40-percent
  3. http://fmc-reg.onecount.net/onecount/redirects/post-gateway.php?redirect=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mdedge.com%2Finternalmedicinenews%2Farticle%2F107263%2Fpractice-management%2F25-hospital-readmissions-may-be-preventable
  4. http://www.hcpro.com/ACC-329301-4634/Study-Single-step-reduces-readmissions-by-25.html

Government websites: spot the legitimate among the fakes 

From: Competition Bureau Canada

News release

Don’t fall for misleading scam sites seeking personal information or credit card data

August 29, 2019 — OTTAWA, ON — Competition Bureau

Browsers beware: scammers are running fake websites meant to mimic real federal government ones. These misleading websites can easily appear to be authentic. The layout, the colour scheme, the red maple leaf graphic – it all looks right. These phony sites could fleece you out of money or personal information…or both!  

When reviewing your Internet search results for government services, don’t assume that the top hit is legitimate. Fake websites may also ask for your credit card information to access forms and services that are free on real government websites. Scammers may demand personal information generally not needed for the service you’re seeking, or they may promise to accelerate your government application, for a fee. Official Government of Canada websites will never ask you to deposit money into a personal bank account or send funds through a private money transfer service. Real government websites will never threaten you or offer “special deals” on government application fees.

Learn to recognize phony government websites:

  • Make sure your browser is up-to-date: Browser filters can help detect fake websites.
  • Look for contact information:Genuine Government of Canada websites will always list a point of contact. Look for Canada.ca or gc.ca e-mails with no typos. Official government websites will also never use private email services such as Hotmail, Yahoo mail or Gmail.
  • Look for both of Canada’s official languages:Information on federal government websites is always available in English and French.

If you’re unsure:

  • Don’t give out personal details:Avoid websites that demand that you transfer money or provide information such as bank account numbers or personal identification, like your Social Insurance Number.
  • Contact 1 800 O-Canada (1-800-622-6232) and ask them if you’re on the right site.

If you believe you’ve been misled by a spoofed government website, contact the Competition Bureau and file a complaint by phone at 1-800-348-5358 or online

Long-term care pharmacy is critical for keeping our loved ones safe.

Pharmacy care in long-term care homes is essential and complex. Vulnerable seniors need as many as a dozen different drugs, at various times every day for multiple conditions. Many of these seniors are affected by dementia and rely on pharmacists and nurses to help them take and manage their medications.

Long-term care pharmacists and staff provide critical, front-line care services that protect our loved ones by making sure they get the medications they need, safely. Every day, they provide supports for seniors living in long-term care homes across Ontario, including services essential for resident safety, such as:

  • daily strip packaging of drugs to provide the right doses in the right combinations at the right times to the right person;
  • 24-hour access to clinical pharmacists at long-term care homes; and
  • state of the art technology that tracks and stores medicines to make sure they are in stock and dispensed safely.

The Ontario government is cutting pharmacy services in long-term care homes by almost 50%. Without the funding necessary to maintain these critical services, overburdened long-term care homes will be forced to do more with less, putting more seniors at risk of medication errors.

Medication errors, which can be life-threatening, are among the leading causes of seniors ending up in emergency rooms, or hospitalized, where they are at greater risk.

Our seniors are at risk. The recent report from the Long-Term Care Homes Public Inquiry led by Justice Eileen Gillese raised the urgent need for increased funding in Ontario’s long-term care homes for seniors’ medication management. Despite this, the government is doing the exact opposite.

Help stop the cuts!
Let your voice be heard.

Trivia Answers: 1. Beaver, 2. Lady Gaga, 3. Nine, 4. Alaska, 5. Paris 6. Angel Falls, Venezuela

 

  • January 2, 2020
  • February 6, 2020
  • March 5, 2020

Region 1 Retired Members Meeting Minutes: October 9, 2019 – Windsor

Spring 2020

OPSEU Region One Retirees Meeting of 09 Oct 2019, Windsor Region One Office, 130-3005 Marentette Ave, Windsor, ON, N8X 4G1

Meeting commenced at 10:30 a.m.

1.0    Statement of Respect read by Chair, Brian Sharp

2.0    Statement of Aboriginal Land Awareness read by Chair

3.0    Moment of Silence for brother Bob Petrie who passed

4.0    Adoption of Agenda

Motion to adopt: Ben Mcbride

Seconded: Ernie Kunka

Carried

5.0    Adoption of Minutes

Motion to Adopt: Helen McCabe

Seconded: Ross Langill

Carried

6.0    Business Arising from Minutes

-Ross Langill and Evelyn Anger

-Re: Lifetime Retirees

-Regional Board Members put forth Activist’s names from each region to be chosen as Lifetime Retirees

-graduated list from oldest to youngest

-resolution WILL be put forth at the next convention

7.0    Executive Board Members Reports

-Len Elliott, Regional Vice President

-Thanked us for inviting him

-Ron Eliott “Officially Retired” from OPSEU

-thanked him for 30 years of hard work

-he’s home, teaching himself to relax

-Protecting Plans

-guaranteed raises

-June 2020’s Agenda

-getting rid of protection

-explained Pension Plans since 2016 re: smoothing

-conditional indexing in a predicament

-numbers didn’t jive

-CPP Enhancement Integration

-Len explained CPP’s History

-We fought for CPP for every Canadian

-OPT has a new CEO: Peter Lindley

-OPSEU Board passed a motion re: Federal Election

-we encourage you to vote

-we recommend the NDP

-CUPE avoided a massive strike, hats off to them

-Thank you for having me

7.1    Jennifer Van Zetten, Executive Board Member

-Keep LCBO in the Public’s Hands

-information at a local Windsor LCBO

-stop in between 1 and 3 p.m. for 5-10 minutes

7.2    Laurie Nancekivell, Executive Board Member

-Environmental Racism Conference, Nov 2nd

-8:30 a.m. Register, 9-4 p.m. Conference

-London Regional Office, 1092 Dearness Dr.

-Resolution Questions call or text Laurie/Jenn

-Fight Ford Fund, Executive Board passed a campaign

-If anyone needs help in fighting a cause call us, we will help you develop it (examples below)

-Local 130’s BBQ drew attention to Mental Health, Homelessness, Addiction Issues

-for Jeff Yurek’s Office Rally, we got busses for them

-Re: Correction (Evelyn Anger)

-OPS Corrections has their own contract

-gave up the right to strike

-will work with an arbitrator

8.0 Speaker:   Constable Surgeet Gill,

Windsor Police Community Service

-showed a video on Fraud, Scams, Identity stealing

9.0 Adjournment: 1:30 p.m.

Motion to adjourn: Ben McBride

Seconded: Debbie Riopelle, Member at Large

Carried

Respectfully submitted,

Fran Jajal, Secretary, Region One Retirees

Windsor, Ontario

23 Members attended, 3 EBM’s,

Orientation des présidents de section locale - Réservez les dates des séances de l'automne 2019!

Automne 2019 – Orientation des présidents de section locale

Le SEFPO conduira deux séances d’orientation des présidents de section locale l’automne prochain.

Cet atelier de trois jours permettra aux présidents de section locale d’acquérir les compétences et les outils dont ils ont besoin pour remplir leur rôle de leader au sein du syndicat et naviguer dans la structure organisationnelle, les systèmes, les soutiens et les ressources du SEFPO.

Notez que cet atelier est réservé aux présidents de section locale qui n’y ont encore jamais assisté.

Nous contacter

Pour plus d’information, veuillez communiquer avec Andrea Meunier, secrétaire de l’Unité de la formation des membres, par téléphone, au numéro 1-800-268-7376, poste 8299, ou, par courriel, à l’adresse PresidentsOrientation@opseu.org.

Dates et heures

Séance 1 :

Mardi 10 septembre – 9 h à 16 h 30
Mercredi 11 septembre – 9 h à 16 h 30
Jeudi 12 septembre – 9 h à 14 h

Séance 2 :

Mardi 17 septembre – 9 h à 16 h 30
Mercredi 18 septembre – 9 h à 16 h 30
Jeudi 19 septembre – 9 h à 14 h

‘Keep it Public’ Store Tours

The Ford government is pushing a privatization agenda that threatens the long-term survival of the LCBO.

With his plan for the dramatic expansion of alcohol sales to corner stores, big-box stores and more grocery stores, Doug Ford is putting private interests above the public good.

Come out on your break and meet your union representatives. Enjoy a coffee and timbit and learn about what you can do to push back against privatization.

Region 1

Local 162

Chatham

Store 427
807 St. Clair St.
April 26, 2019
10:00 a.m.

Leamington

Store 153
16 Seacliff Dr. E.
April 26, 2019
12:00 p.m. (noon)

Kingsville

Store 286
410 Main St. E.
April 26, 2019
1:30 p.m.

Amherstburg

Store 109
495 Sandwich St. S.
April 26, 2019
3:00 p.m.

Lasalle

Store 370
1825 Wyoming Ave.
April 26, 2019
4:30 p.m.

Windsor

Store 367
3165 Howard Ave.
April 27, 2019
10:00 a.m.

Store 539
4 Huron Church Rd.
April 27, 2019
10:30 a.m.

Store 34
1320 Walker Road.
April 27, 2019
1:00 p.m.

Store 490
7640 Tecumseh Rd. E.
April 27, 2019
2:30 p.m.

Tecumseh

Store 278
15 Amy Croft Dr.
April 27, 2019
4:00 p.m.
Local 163

Sarnia

Store 46
250 North Christina St.
April 26, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Store 202
1142 Lakeshore Rd.
April 26, 2019
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Store 459
1450 Quinn Dr.
April 26, 2019
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

London North

Store 393
109 Fanshawe Park Rd.
April 26, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Store 310
681 Wonderland North
April 26, 2019
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Store 741
1981 Hyde Park Rd.
April 26, 2019
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

London West

Store 200
348 Clarke Rd.
April 26, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Store 27
900 Oxford St. E.
April 26, 2019
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Store 26
71 York St.
April 26, 2019
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

London South

Store 575
1073 Wellington Rd. S.
April 26, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Store 438
3050 Wonderland Rd. S.
April 26, 2019
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Store 593
1240 Commissioners Rd. W.
April 26, 2019
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Local 165

Brantford

Store 559
300 King George Rd.
April 26, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Store 373
84 Lynden Rd.
April 26, 2019
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Store 44
50 Market St. S.
April 26, 2019
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Woodstock

Store 64
959 Dundas St.
April 27, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Stratford

Store 60
91 Wellington St.&
April 27, 2019
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Store 644
1067 Ontario St.
April 27, 2019
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Region 2

Local 287

Burlington

Store 641
501 Appleby Line
May 8, 2019
11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Store 481
1235 Fairview St.
May 8, 2019
1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Hamilton

Store 233
657 Upper James St.
May 9, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Dundas

Store 25
119 Osler Dr.
May 9, 2019
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Ancaster

Store 665
1191 Wilson St. W.
May 9, 2019
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Hamilton

Store 150
1342 South Service Rd.
May 10, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Store 23
1149 Barton St. E.
May 10, 2019
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Stoney Creek

Store 545
75 Centennial Parkway North
May 10, 2019
12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Region 3

Local 377

Whitby

Store 587
74 Thickson Rd. S.
May 1, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Oshawa

Store 378
400 Gibb St. 
May 1, 2019
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Store 465
1409 Harmony Rd. 
May 1, 2019
2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Bowmanville

Store 263
2344 Highway #2
May 1, 2019
2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Pickering

Store 776
1899 Brock Rd.
May 1, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Store 434
705 Kingston Rd. 
May 1, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Local 378

Whitby

Store 587
74 Thickson Rd. S.
May 1, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Oshawa

Store 378
400 Gibb St. 
May 1, 2019
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Bowmanville

Store 263
2344 Highway #2
May 1, 2019
2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Durham Warehouse

2000 Boundary Rd.
May 9, 2019

7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Durham Warehouse

2000 Boundary Rd.
May 10, 2019

7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Local 379

Apsley

Store 318
3 Burleigh St. 
May 7, 2019

Bancroft

Store 208
315 Hastings St. N. 
May 7, 2019

Maynooth

Store 478
33004 Hwy. 62 North
May 7, 2019

Bobcaygeon

Store 222
37 King St. E.  
May 7, 2019

Haliburton

Store 223
230 Highland St.
May 7, 2019

Minden

Store 136
18 Water St.
May 7, 2019

Coboconk

Store 305
13 Albert St.
May 7, 2019

Bewdley

Store 594
5087 Rice Lake Drive North
May 8, 2019

Millbrook

Store 254
4 Centre Street
May 8, 2019

Port Hope

Store 79
15 Ontario St.
May 8, 2019

Cobourg

Store 39
63 Albert St.
May 8, 2019

Store 609
1111 Elgin St. W.
May 8, 2019

Colborne

Store 380
9 Toronto Rd., Hwy 2
May 8, 2019

Brighton

Store 247
11 Park St.
May 8, 2019

Warkworth

Store 472
44 Church St.
May 8, 2019

Campbellford

Store 178
37 Front St. S.
May 8, 2019

Lindsay

Store 82
449 Kent St. W.
May 10, 2019

Omemee

Store 281
4 King St.
May 10, 2019

Peterborough

Store 358
1154 Chemong Rd.
May 10, 2019

Store 45
196 Sherbrooke St.
May 10, 2019

Store 35
879 Lansdowne St. E.
May 10, 2019

Store 343
400 Lansdowne St. E.
May 10, 2019

Region 4

Local 498

Petawawa

Store 266
2 Renfrew St.
May 6, 2019
10:00 a.m. 

Pembroke

Store 55
1050 Pembroke St. E.
May 6, 2019
12:00 p.m. (noon)

Renfrew

Store 144
910 O’Brien Rd.
May 6, 2019
2:00 p.m.

Arnprior

Store 85
10 Williams St. W.
May 6, 2019
4:00 p.m.

Ottawa

Store 36
457 Hazeldean Rd.
May 9, 2019
10:00 a.m.

Store 556
499 Terry Fox Drive
May 9, 2019
12:00 p.m. (noon)

Store 638
858 March Rd.
May 9, 2019
4:00 p.m.

Stittsville

Store 569
6065 Hazeldean Rd.
May 9, 2019
2:00 p.m.

 

Local 4100

Hawkesbury

Store 83
40-452 County Rd. 17&
May 7, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Alexandria

Store 98
410 Main St.&
May 7, 2019
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Lancaster

Store 123
16 Molan St.&
May 7, 2019
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Long Sault

Store 435
33 Long Sault Dr.&
May 9, 2019
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Cornwall

Store 49
1315-B Second St. 
May 9, 2019
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Store 540
11-960 Brookdale Ave. 
May 9, 2019
3:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

 

Region 5

Local  5107

Toronto

Store 398
662 Burnhamthrope Rd. 
May 10, 2019
11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Store 295
3520 Dundas St. E. 
May 10, 2019
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Store 149
2946 Bloor St. W.  
May 11, 2019
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Store 633
3730 Lakeshore Blvd. E.&
May 11, 2019
5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Mississauga

Store 627
1520 Dundas St. E.  
May 10, 2019
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Brampton

Store 416
88 Peel Centre Dr.
May 11, 2019
11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Local 5108

Toronto

Store 643
808 York Mills Rd.
May 3, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Store 164
65 Wicksteed Ave.
May 3, 2019
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Store 253
195 The Donway West
May 3, 2019
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Store 457
2300 Yonge St.
May 11, 2019
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Store 7
101 Eglinton Ave. E.
May 11, 2019
12:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

Store 636
333 Eglinton Ave. E.
May 11, 2019
2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Store 452
1838-1844 Avenue Rd.
May 11, 2019
3:45 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Local 5110

Toronto

Store 411
547 Yonge St.
Apr. 23, 2019

Store 333
100 King St. W.;
Apr. 23, 2019

Store 572
1245 Dupont St.
Apr. 23, 2019

Store 18
85 Hanna Ave.
Apr. 23, 2019

Store 8
908 St. Clair Ave. W.
Apr. 24, 2019

Store 2
396 St. Clair Ave. W.
Apr. 24, 2019

Store 651
111 St.  Clair Ave. W.
Apr. 24, 2019

Store 639
491 College St.
Apr. 24, 2019

Store 3
1230 Dundas St. W.
Apr. 24, 2019

Store 14
337 Spadina Ave.
Apr. 24, 2019

Store 15
232 Dupont St.
Apr. 25, 2019

Store 10
10 Scrivener Sq.
Apr. 25, 2019

Store 646
777 Bay St.
Apr. 25, 2019

Store 532
87 Front St. E.
Apr. 25, 2019

Local 5111

Toronto

Store 4
200 Danforth Ave.
Apr. 27, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Store 697
1986 Queen St. E.
Apr. 27, 2019
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Store 5
1654 Queen St. E.
Apr. 27, 2019
2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Store 242
510 Brimley Rd.
Apr. 27, 2019
4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Store 428
785 Milner Ave.
Apr. 27, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Store 198
4525 Kingston Rd.
Apr. 27, 2019
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Store 269
3441 Lawrence Ave. E.
Apr. 27, 2019
2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Store 703
5979 Steels Ave. E.
Apr. 27, 2019
4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Region 6

Local  681

Sudbury

Store 287
1467 Lasalle Blvd.
May 10, 2019
8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Store 652
1099 Marcus Drive
May 10, 2019
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Store 50
190 Cedar St.
May 10, 2019
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Store 407
2400 Long Lake Rd. 
May 10, 2019
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Capreol

Store 118
12 Hanna St.
May 17, 2019
8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Hanmer

Store 327
5-5085 Hwy. 69
May 17, 2019
9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Val Caron

Store 552
3140 Hwy. 69 North
May 17, 2019
11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (noon)

Copper Cliff

Store 531
12 Serpentine St.
May 17, 2019
12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Lively

Store 395
R.R. #1
May 17, 2019
2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Chelmsford

Store 236
3468 Errington Ave.
May 17, 2019
3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Azilda

Store 405
93 Notre Dame St. W. 
May 17, 2019
5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Region 7

Local 741

Thunder Bay

Store 501
1010 Dawson Rd.
May 10, 2019
10:00 a.m.

Store 155
100 North Cumberland St.
May 10, 2019
11:30 a.m.

Store 616
969 Forth William Rd.
May 10, 2019
1:00 p.m.

Store 602
1095 Arthur St. E.
May 10, 2019
3:00 p.m.

Thunder Bay Warehouse

615 Harold Cres.,
May 10, 2019
2:30 p.m.

Kakabeka Falls

Store 335
4793 Hwy. 11/17
May 10, 2019
4:30 p.m.