Health and Safety Issues – Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) and Ontario Works (OW)

December 2, 2014

Honourable Kevin Daniel Flynn
Ministry of Labour
14th Floor, 400 University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M7A 1T7

Dear Minister Flynn:

Re: Health & Safety Issues – Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) and Ontario Works (OW)

Serious health and safety issues now affect the mental and physical condition of workers at ODSP offices across Ontario. Similar problems are also faced by OPSEU members working in OW. The problems are being caused by the recently implemented Social Assistance Management System (SAMS) computer program.

SAMS is flawed and very difficult to manoeuver. There are constant error messages, frozen screens, shut-downs, etc. Each day, staff is issued reports of a huge number of glitches, bugs and other issues. They are then expected to attempt a manual resolution of the deficiencies.

The issues are exacerbated by the fact that, when SAMS was launched on November 12, the Ministry of Community and Social Services failed to provide caseworkers in ODSP with adequate training.

As a result, there have been many adverse effects: increased incidents of frustration, anger, crying, early departure due to illness and increased sick leave. In addition, mental and physical effects include headaches, memory and concentration lapses.

Given these immediate effects from SAMS, OPSEU anticipates that serious health and safety changes, including chronic conditions, will follow. These cause suffering within the workforce; decrease work satisfaction and effectiveness; add costs and increases in the possibility of innocent errors. Instead of a win/win, the effect of SAMS has created a lose/lose scenario.

This has a collateral effect on clients and the services ODSP and OW provides, especially during the already stressful December period.

Let’s consider some examples. As part of this ODSP “Modernization” program, Welfare Field Workers were advised in October 2010 that caseloads would average 240-260 clients per worker. This would ensure compliance with the OPS Customer Service Standards. Even with this commitment, caseloads now are 20% above this at the 290-310 level. The situation is becoming untenable. This requires decisive action from the Ministry of Labour.

Similar work levels and stresses exist in the OW program for caseworkers and clients alike.

Mental health issues are not excluded from the Act. OPSEU asserts that ignoring these issues is an affront to requirements in the Act under which Employers have a general obligation to ensure the existence and maintenance of a “healthy and safe” workplace.

OPSEU believes public service worksites should be an example for the goals Ontario expects all workplaces to achieve. Where the worksites are those of the Ministry, this connection is immediate and direct. In the case of municipalities with OW, similar connections and initiatives must also apply.

OPSEU also notes that the MOL’s mandate letter from the Premier includes supporting mental health of employees by engaging with companies to learn about and develop strong workplace mental health programs that enhance the well-being of workers in Ontario. Prevention is part of this mandate. Work organization, demands, and workplace support are just a few organizational factors that are identified as psychosocial hazards in the January 13, 2012 Canadian standard, “Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace.”

OPSEU is now filing grievances about this issue, on behalf of many ODSP staff. Health and Safety grievances and complaints may also arise with OW workers. In time, the grievances may remedy some problems and compensate staff for their losses. Even so, added remedial steps are needed now. These could be undertaken by the Ministry of Labour through Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations with Ministry enforcement of worker rights under legislation. Otherwise, damage to worker health will mount.

The Ministry of Labour must insist that municipalities and the ODSP’s ministry and management develop and maintain healthy and safe workplaces.

One way to provide time for a resolution would be to revert to the pre-existing system (still in operation for many 1st Nations who have opted out) while SAMS is perfected and needed training is completed.

To date, work refusals have yet to be invoked by staff. This is becoming an urgent situation for which this measure may be required. As stated in legislation, a worker may refuse to work or do particular work where he or she has reason to believe that, (a) any equipment, machine, device or thing the worker is to use or operate is likely to endanger himself, herself or another worker.

The “thing” in this case is the SAMS program. The “thing” is endangering ODSP and OW staff.

Workers should not suffer the consequences, if the only reason that this hazard is not being enforced is the Ministry’s failure to train their inspectors, or authorize them to assess organizational factors that cause chronic mental stress for workers. OPSEU needs to know that workers can rely on the Ministry of Labour to ensure employers take reasonable precautions in protecting workers’ health and safety.

OPSEU’s ODSP and OW members have every right to expect action from the Ministry of Labour. In this case, it means that the Ministry must insist that Employers provide reasonable, adequate supports, and worker autonomy with the introduction of new workplace systems, rules, and expectations.

Respectfully,
               
Signatures on original letter

Warren (Smokey) Thomas
President, OPSEU

Roxanne Barnes
MERC Chair
OPSEU MCSS

Tara Langford
Chair, OPSEU
Municipalities Sector

Letter to the Honourable Helena Jaczek re: Social Assistance Management System (SAMS)

December 2, 2014

The Honourable Helena Jaczek
Minister of Community and Social Services
80 Grosvenor Street
Hepburn Block, 6th Floor
Toronto Ontario
M7A 1E9

Dear Dr. Jaczek:

On July 11, 2014 I wrote to you to outline my union’s concerns with respect to the implementation of the Social Assistance Management System (SAMS). At that time I expressed concern over the detrimental impact the program would have on the nearly 900,000 adults and children that rely on assistance from the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) and Ontario Works (OW). I further indicated that OPSEU members working in the ODSP and OW programs were concerned that unless improvements were made to SAMS, the launch in November would be rife with problems and delays and poor service to the recipients we work with.

Those concerns have come true.

Since SAMS was launched on November 12, OPSEU members working in the ODSP, OW and Assistance for Children with Severe Disabilities Program (ACSD) have experienced non-stop technical problems and functionality issues with the program. To date, the ITS Help Desk has received 6,295 calls from SAMS users reporting technical problems with the program, and logged 6,785 separate incident tickets.

To put it simply, SAMS is not working.

OPSEU members are scrambling to implement workarounds and fixes to ensure their clients receive the assistance they rely upon. In spite of their best efforts, staff continue to be overwhelmed as more data conversion problems are identified and the number of known defects with SAMS increases by the day.

By month-end, the sheer volume of technical problems with SAMS resulted in thousands of recipients of ODSP, OW and ACSD assistance receiving payments for incorrect sums; payments missing additional benefits; payments issued with invalid arrears; or no payments at all. Staff working in these programs attempted to resolve as many of these issues as possible by identifying program errors and issuing manual cheques to clients. As you can imagine, frustration levels for both clients and staff were very high.

Minister, on August 13 you wrote to me and made it clear that client service was your ministry’s priority and that you felt it was important to evaluate the success of SAMS and “look for opportunities to further assist staff in managing their day-to-day work assisting clients.” With this statement I cannot agree with you more.

The vulnerable Ontarians receiving social assistance in this province deserve a much better standard of service than this, and staff working in the ODSP, OW and ACSD programs cannot deliver quality service with a broken case management system.

It is time for your ministry to take decisive action to support clients and staff. SAMS is not working and my members and I feel that the best and most prudent decision would be to reinstate SDMT until a time in which SAMS is error free and fully functional.

Sincerely,

Signature on original letter

Warren (Smokey) Thomas
President, OPSEU

Fonction publique de l'Ontario : Le lobby à Queen’s Park pour mettre fin à la privatisation des services informatiques attire l'attention des 40 députés dont 4 ministres

Les membres du personnel informatique représentés par le SEFPO à travers la province se sont réunis à Queen 's Park le 27 octobre pour demander aux députés de mettre fin à la privatisation des services informatiques du gouvernement.

Leur message a attiré l’attention de beaucoup de politiciens importants. Tout au long de la matinée plus de 40 députés ont assisté à l'événement dont 14 du NPD, 12 du PC et 17 libéraux.  Parmi les participants libéraux on compte quatre ministres et le leader parlementaire adjoint du gouvernement.

Plus de 75 personnes se sont rassemblées dans une salle des comités pour parler avec les professionnels de l'informatique et écouter les présentations décrivant comment la privatisation des services informatiques du gouvernement a conduit à la baisse de la qualité des services, à l’augmentation des coûts, et à l'élimination de bons emplois.

Les 16 professionnels de l'informatique sont venus des différents ministères et des lieux de travail à Ottawa, Guelph, Sudbury et Toronto.  Ils ont été rejoints par le président du SEFPO, Warren (Smokey) Thomas, le membre du Conseil exécutif de la région 5, Edie Strachan, la présidente de l’équipe centrale et unifiée de négociation de la FPO, Roxanne Barnes, et les membres de l'équipe de négociation, Mickey Riccardi, Elaine Young, John Berry, Dennis Wilson, Glenna Caldwell, Dylan Lineger et Tim Elphick.

Le président Gary Gannage, la vice-présidente Sally Pardaens, le trésorier Dave Bulmer et la secrétaire Barbara Gough d’AMAPCEO ont apporté leur soutien et manifesté leur solidarité au lobby.

Les deux syndicats ont clairement indiqué qu'il est temps pour le gouvernement de cesser de gaspiller de l'argent sur les fournisseurs et les consultants et d’investir dans l’élaboration de sa capacité interne en utilisant plus de 3 600 syndiqués professionnels de l'informatique.

« Le gouvernement gaspille des centaines de millions de dollars chaque année sur les services informatiques offerts par les fournisseurs et les consultants du secteur privé, » a déclaré le président du SEFPO, Warren (Smokey) Thomas.

« Nous sommes ici aujourd'hui pour donner un véritable preuve que la prestation des services du secteur privé ne fonctionne pas.  Les professionnels informatiques du gouvernement sont plus efficaces, coûtent moins cher, et ont les connaissances et l'expertise nécessaires pour fournir à la FPO des services informatiques de qualité dont dépendent les employés pour faire leur travail. »

En outre, les députés néo-démocrates ont montré leur soutien en prenant nos préoccupations directement à l’Assemblée législature.  Au cours de la période de questions, le porte-parole de Conseil du Trésor et des finances du NPD, Catherine Fife (députée de Kitchener-Waterloo) a demandé au gouvernement Wynne pourquoi il continue à dépenser des centaines de millions de dollars chaque année sur les fournisseurs et les consultants du secteur privé lorsque le propre rapport du gouvernement indique que les services du secteur privé coûtent plus que le double.  La réponse du gouvernement s’est tenue à l'écart de ces préoccupations, et a porté presque entièrement sur les dépenses du gouvernement sur la rémunération des services de consultants.

À la suite de la réception, les députés néo-démocrates ont continué à soulever des préoccupations sur la privatisation des services informatiques du gouvernement.  Ils ont posé la question relative au stockage privé des données du secteur privé et à la sous-utilisation du Centre de données Guelph.

Conçue pour échouer - Pourquoi la sous-traitance des services informatiques est une mauvaise idée

Le gouvernement Wynne envisage de privatiser les principaux aspects de l'infrastructure de ses services informatiques en dépit du fait que les employés du gouvernement offrent les mêmes services à un coût moins élevé.

Les membres du SEFPO s'inquiètent.  La sous-traitance est totalement inutile et c'est un gaspillage de l'argent.  La capacité, la connaissance et l'expérience pour fournir les services informatiques existent dans la FPO.

Pour en savoir plus, veuillez regarder la nouvelle vidéo du SEFPO (en anglais seulement) Designed to Fail: Why the outsourcing of IT services is a bad idea.

{“fid”:”24622″,”view_mode”:”youtube”,”fields”:{“format”:”youtube”,”filename_field[en][0][value]”:”IvwzHdPh9po”},”type”:”media”,”link_text”:”IvwzHdPh9po”,”attributes”:{“class”:”file media-element file-youtube”}}

Mettons fin à la privatisation des services informatiques de la FPO - Envoyez un courriel à votre député provincial

Le gouvernement Wynne envisage de privatiser les principaux aspects de l'infrastructure de ses services informatiques en dépit du fait que les employés du gouvernement offrent les mêmes services à un coût moins élevé.

Veuillez remplir le formulaire ci-dessous pour dire à votre député provincial que la solution est claire : le service offert par les professionnels informatiques de la FPO est MEILLEUR, MOINS CHER, ÉQUITABLE !

Nous pouvons LE faire ! Feuille de renseignements

Pourquoi la sous-traitance des services informatiques de la FPO est une mauvaise idée

Le gouvernement Wynne envisage de privatiser les principaux aspects de l’infrastructure de ses services informatiques en dépit du fait que les employés du gouvernement offrent les mêmes services à un coût moins élevé.

Coût plus élevé

Le budget des services informatiques du gouvernement pour 2013-14 était de 1,2 milliard de dollars.  Cinquante-huit pour cent, ou 703 millions de dollars, ont été versés à des fournisseurs privés pour le matériel, les logiciels et les services.  La proportion du budget global de ce qui va au secteur privé a augmenté de 63 pour cent au cours des cinq dernières années.

Le gouvernement a versé plus de 652 millions de dollars en cinq ans à trois fournisseurs, Compugen, CompuCom et Telus, pour les services de bureau, les services d'administration de serveur et de réseau, travail qui a été fait une fois et se fait encore à des degrés divers, par les employés du gouvernement.

Le gouvernement a versé un montant supplémentaire de 131 millions de dollars en 2013-14 à 1 479 consultants embauchés par tâche ou projet. Ces consultants sont destinés à être embauchés pour une durée déterminée et/ou quand il y a un manque de ressources internes pour doter un projet.  Cependant, les employés du gouvernement ont observé le même tarif pour les consultants en milieu de travail depuis des années.

Le rapport 2012 d'un consultant pour le ministère des Services gouvernementaux (anciennement en charge de la technologie de l’information du gouvernement) a trouvé que des entrepreneurs privés coûtent deux à trois fois plus que les employés du gouvernement pour cinq des six types de services informatiques.  Le consultant a constaté que 25 pour cent du personnel impliqué directement dans le travail des services informatiques du gouvernement sont des entrepreneurs privés.

La qualité du service baissée

La sous-traitance a-t-elle donné lieu à de meilleurs services ? Non, au contraire. La privatisation a donné lieu à des retards et à de mauvais services :

  • Dans le temps, le personnel informatique du gouvernement prenait de 30 minutes à 2 heures pour faire une image d'un ordinateur de bureau. Maintenant que les vendeurs sont responsables de la création d'images, l'imagerie d'un ordinateur de bureau peut prendre entre six à huit heures. Il y a 80 000 ordinateurs individuels, ordinateurs portables et des tablettes dans le fonctionnement de la FPO.
  • Le personnel informatique du gouvernement était responsable de l'installation des mises à jour sur des centaines de serveurs « clients » pour les applications informatiques pour 28 ministères.  Maintenant, il est tenu de fournir des instructions aux entrepreneurs privés toutes les heures. Une mise à jour unique de 800 serveurs exigera 800 demandes identiques.  Le gouvernement a plus de 4 000 serveurs.
  • Les mises à jour sur les serveurs du gouvernement sont souvent retardées parce que l’entrepreneur privé n'a pas de personnel pendant les heures convenables qui sont des soirées et des fins de semaine.
  • Les employés de la FPO qui ont besoin d'une prise réseau activée afin qu'ils puissent accéder à l'Internet attendent maintenant jusqu'à trois jours pour que quelque chose se produise alors que dans le passé, un rapide coup de téléphone à un employé des services informatiques du gouvernement a pu régler le problème en peu de temps.
  • Le personnel informatique du gouvernement qui se trouvait dans les bureaux d’à côté était prêt à aider les collègues de la FPO à n’importe quel moment lorsqu’il y avait un problème informatique; mais maintenant il personnel informatique a déménagé dans d’autres bureaux ou édifices; ajoutant ainsi un autre délai à la résolution de problèmes informatiques.  (Si l'entrepreneur privé ne peut pas résoudre le problème, on fait appel à un employé des services informatiques du gouvernement.)

La sécurité et le caractère confidentiel des données sous menace

Le gouvernement Wynne planifie de fermer 22 centres de données du gouvernement d'ici 2016.  Pour ce faire, le gouvernement fera le transfert de ses données et la gestion des serveurs informatiques et des applications dans le nuage exploité par le secteur privé.  L’informatique en nuage est le stockage et le traitement de données sur des serveurs situés n'importe où sur la planète avec les entrepreneurs privés ayant l'accès aux données via Internet.  Cela signifie que les programmes gouvernementaux dont dépendent les Ontariens (par exemple, l'aide sociale, le RAFEO, le renouvellement de permis de conduire, etc.) et même le système de messagerie du gouvernement pourraient fonctionner dans le nuage, les données étant stockées à l'extérieur du Canada.  Le gouvernement refuse de divulguer les renseignements sur les applications qui seront stockées sur des serveurs dans le nuage.

La privatisation éliminera de bons emplois

La décision du gouvernement Wynne de sous-traiter les services informatiques éliminera de bons emplois de la classe moyenne avec des salaires et des avantages sociaux décents et les remplacera par la main-d'œuvre moins coûteuse.  Une partie de ce travail sera presque certainement fait par les sous-traitants situés dans d'autres pays.

Par exemple, une équipe d'environ 100 testeurs et développeurs de logiciels employés par le ministère des Services sociaux et communautaires à 5700, rue Yonge à Toronto a travaillé pendant deux ans, à partir de 2012, en tandem avec une équipe de taille similaire de travailleurs des services informatiques en Inde lors de l'élaboration du nouveau système de gestion des dossiers d'aide sociale du gouvernement, dénommé SAMS.  Environ 8 employés représentés par le SEFPO, travaillaient comme testeurs de logiciels au ministère et ils ont passé six mois à former 40 travailleurs indiens sur la façon de faire leur travail.  Les membres du SEFPO s’inquiètent de la possibilité d’être finalement remplacés par ces travailleurs indiens.  Les travailleurs indiens sont supposés d’être embauchés par un sous-traitant d'IBM Canada qui a obtenu le contrat pour développer le système SAMS.

La fermeture des centres de données du gouvernement aura un impact sur presque 300 employés de la fonction publique représentés par le SEFPO.

En outre, le gouvernement planifie  de privatiser complètement les services de bureau, laissant 64 000 employés de la FPO à la merci des entrepreneurs privés.  Étant donné que pratiquement tous les services publics comptent sur les ordinateurs, cette décision pourrait sérieusement entraver le fonctionnement quotidien du gouvernement.  La sous-traitance des services de bureau et des services dans les différentes régions de la province, dès mai 2015, aura un impact sur presque 265 postes de la fonction publique dont les titulaires sont membres du SEFPO.

Bâtir la capacité interne

Ce qui tracasse les membres du SEFPO le plus, c’est que la sous-traitance est totalement inutile et c’est un gaspillage d'argent.  La capacité, les connaissances et l'expérience nécessaires pour fournir des services informatiques existent au sein de la FPO.

Par exemple, le Centre de données Guelph, construit comme un P3, à un coût estimé au gouvernement de l’Ontario de 350 millions de dollars sur plus de 30 ans, et ouvert depuis 2011, a une capacité de serveur bien suffisante pour répondre aux besoins du gouvernement, aujourd’hui et dans l'avenir.  En outre, il s’agit d’un établissement un très sécurisé, construit pour résister à des tornades et des tremblements de terre.

Le SEFPO se préoccupe sérieusement de la relation étroite entre les cadres supérieurs des services informatiques du Conseil du Trésor et les fournisseurs qui obtiennent des contrats du gouvernement.  Les membres du SEFPO savent qu'au moins trois anciens cadres supérieurs des services 'informatiques qui ont quitté le gouvernement pour occuper des emplois chez les fournisseurs.

Le syndicat a écrit au juge Sidney Linden, commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts de l'Ontario, et Steve Orsini, secrétaire du Cabinet, en leur demandant de faire une enquête sur d'éventuels conflits d'intérêt dans les contrats informatiques actuels et éventuels du gouvernement.

Le SEFPO représente environ 2 400 employés des services informatiques du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du gouvernement (responsables de la gestion de l'infrastructure informatique commune du gouvernement), et dans les neuf « groupes » qui fournissent des services à des ministères et organismes qui s’y rattachent.  AMAPCEO représente un autre groupe de 1200 employés des services informatiques dans la FPO, ce qui pour un effectif total syndiqué d'environ 3 600.  Au minimum, il y a 1 400 consultants informatiques non syndiqués.

Parmi les postes dont les titulaires sont représentés par le SEFPO on compte l’agent de soutien à la technologie infrastructure, l’analyste de programmes, l’analyste de systèmes et l'analyste de l’administration de systèmes.

Nous pouvons LE faire ! Campagne : Des recherches approfondies sur les coûts et les impacts de la privatisation des services informatiques dans la FPO

Le gouvernement envisage d’exécuter son plan de privatisation agressif qui met à risque les emplois du personnel informatique.

Durant l'été, le SEFPO a mené des recherches approfondies sur les coûts et les impacts de la privatisation de l'informatique dans la FPO.  Nous avons étudié les états financiers des ministères, déposé des demandes d'accès à l'information et interrogé nos membres.

Voici ce que nous avons appris :

  • Faire fonctionner des réseaux, bases de données et 81 000 ordinateurs personnels, ordinateurs portables et tablettes qui fournissent les services dont dépendent les Ontariens et Ontariennes coûte environ 1,2 milliard de dollars annuellement.
  • De ce montant, 703 millions de dollars, ou 58 %, va au secteur privé.
  • La part du secteur privé du travail informatique du gouvernement a augmenté de 63 % au cours des cinq dernières années.
  • Un rapport de consultant 2012 pour le ministère des Services gouvernementaux a constaté que les entrepreneurs privés coûtent deux à trois fois plus que les employés du gouvernement pour cinq des six services.
  • Depuis 2009, le gouvernement avait versé plus de 652 millions de dollars à trois fournisseurs, Compugen, CompuCom et TELUS, pour fournir des services qui étaient autrefois offerts et sont encore offerts à des degrés divers, par les membres du SEFPO.
  • En 2013-14, le gouvernement a dépensé 131 millions de dollars sur 1 479 consultants indépendants recrutés par tâche ou projet.
  • Les membres du SEFPO qui travaillent dans l'informatique trouvent eux-mêmes de plus en plus responsables de la réparation des erreurs et du nettoyage des dégâts créés par le travail des vendeurs inefficaces et au-dessous des normes.

Il est clair pour nous que le plan du gouvernement Wynne d’élargir la sous-traitance des services informatiques ajoutera aux coûts, non pas les réduire, et aura encore plus d'impact sur la qualité des services reçus par les OPS.

Nous devons maintenant faire pression auprès du gouvernement pour qu’il agisse de manière responsable et mette fin à la privatisation des services informatiques.

Nous présenterons les résultats de nos recherches aux deputés provinciaux à Queen's Park le :

Lundi 27 octobre
De 10 h à 13 h 30

Salle des comités 228
Édifice de l’Assemblée législative, Queen's Park

Nous dirons aux députés provinciaux que l’Ontario peut économiser au moins 200 millions de dollars par ans en gardant les services informatiques dans la FPO.

Pour de plus amples renseignements, veuillez consulter notre nouvelle publication (en anglais seulement) : Better, Cheaper, Fairer: the case for contracting in of public services in Ontario.

We Can Do IT! Campaign

In recent years the Ontario government has increasingly pursued private sector delivery of IT services to the Ontario Public Service. This approach has increased costs, reduced service quality and eliminated good jobs.

We now must put pressure on the government to act responsibly and put an end to IT privatization.

By putting the brakes on privatization, the government could save hundreds of millions of dollars annually and prevent the elimination of thousands of good jobs.

The evidence is clear: services provided by OPS IT professionals truly are BETTER, CHEAPER, FAIRER.

To learn more about the case for 'contracting-in' public services, please check out OPSEU's new publication: Better, Cheaper, Fairer: The case for contracting in of public services.

Developmental Services Sector Chair visits locals across the province

Developmental Services sector chair Patti Markland is on the road this month visiting several OPSEU Developmental Services locals across the province.

Patti is encouraging members to give their employers a strong message that we are willing to do what it takes to ensure developmental services are accessible and available in all communities across the province.

As bargaining commences, it is crucial that we put pressure on the employer to follow through on promised improvements.

Want Patti to visit your local? You can contact her at:

Patti Markland: (613) 848-6016
patti.markland@gmail.com

This month Patti visited the following locals:

Local 357 – Community Living Huronia
Local 473 – Madawaska Valley
Local 702 – Kenora Association for Community Living
Local 738 – Avenue II Community Program Services, Thunder Bay
Local 740 – Community Living Thunder Bay

In the coming weeks, Patti will visit several more locals:

September 30
Local 161 – Community Living Tilsonburg

October 2
Local 448 – Community Living Prince Edward

October 6
Local 358 – Community Living Peterborough

October 21
Local 166 – Community Living London

Stay connected with OPSEU Developmental Services on social media:

Follow us on twitter @DSbecausewecare
Follow our blog http://dsbecausewecare.blogspot.ca
Like our Facebook page: Opseu-Developmental-Services

Back by popular demand! Order DS t-shirts online until February.

OPSEU Developmental Services shirts are available for online orders again! Order your “Dignity is Not Optional” shirt online today. You'll have a great shirt, and each time you wear it, you'll be showing your support for developmental services and your bargaining team.

Go to the developmental services facebook page to see members wearing the shirts in solidarity with Dec. 11 and 12 talks for better wages and stable jobs for frontline workers.   

T-shirt sizes are available in men’s and women’s styles.

Single shirt:

  • $16/each plus tax

Bulk Order:

  • 50-99       $12.72/each plus tax
  • 100-249   $12.00/each plus tax
  • 250>        $11.00/each plus tax

Cut-off date for orders is Friday, February 13, 2015.

To place an order NOW visit: opseushop.com and click on Developmental Services Campaign.

Related: Developmental Services Bargaining 2014 Index

Une dernière semaine mémorable dans la Région 7 pour L'express de l'équité

Résumé de la 7e semaine

Le 14 juin, L'express de l'équité est arrivé à Thunder Bay – première étape de huit journées riches en événements dans la Région 7. Du 14 juin au 21 juin, le gros autobus vert a fait escale à Thunder Bay, Kakabeka Falls, Fort Frances, Rainy River, Sioux Narrows, Dryden, Vermillion Bay, Sioux Lookout et Kenora.

À Thunder Bay, les activistes de la Région 7 du SEFPO, Elaine Kerr et James Nowe, ainsi que les membres du Conseil exécutif Marie Cory, Carl Thibodeau et Glen Archer, se sont joints à l'équipe de L'express de l'équité. Dans l'après-midi, ils ont tous participé au défilé de la 4e Fierté Thunder. Très heureuse de participer au défilé, l'équipe de L'express de l'équité a reçu le renfort de Robert Hampsey, président de l'Alliance arc-en-ciel du SEFPO, et de plusieurs autres activistes du SEFPO.

Le cortège a traversé le centre-ville de Thunder Bay pour terminer sa marche au parc de la Marina pour les festivités de la Fierté. Dans le parc où nous avions dressé notre tente, nous avons conversé avec plusieurs centaines de gens de la région qui s'étaient déplacés pour montrer leur fierté et soutenir les membres des communautés des LGBT.

Le 16 juin, L'express de l'équité s'est rendu à Fort Frances pour discuter des inégalités de revenus avec les gens du coin. Toutefois, la petite collectivité du Nord de l'Ontario était en état d'urgence, car les eaux du lac Rainy avaient atteint un niveau sans précédent depuis 1950. Plusieurs routes étaient déjà inondées et les responsables locaux redoutaient une aggravation de la situation.

La communauté ayant besoin de bénévoles pour remplir et porter des sacs de sable, l'équipe a décidé de prêter main-forte aux résidents pour les aider à protéger les quais et bâtiments situés sur les rives du lac Rainy.

Une aide modeste, mais les membres de l'équipe ont été heureux de pouvoir donner un coup de main.

Le lendemain, nous avons appris que la communauté voisine de Rainy River était également en état d'urgence en raison des niveaux d'eau élevés. Nous avons décidé d'aller aider la communauté avec les efforts mis en œuvre pour lutter contre la montée des eaux.

Dès notre arrivée, nous avons constaté la gravité de la situation. Plusieurs maisons étaient directement menacées par les eaux. De nombreux jardins étaient totalement submergés et l'eau montait toujours. Les autorités locales s'attendaient à ce que la rivière continue de monter d'au moins huit pouces de plus en raison d'un avertissement de pluie forte.

L'équipe a aidé un couple de personnes âgées à ériger un mur de sacs de sable autour de leur maison afin d'empêcher les eaux de pénétrer à l'intérieur. Leur jardin était complètement submergé par les eaux qui affleuraient à la porte d'entrée. Plusieurs personnes de la communauté nous ont rejoints et, en quelques heures, nous avons érigé un mur autour de la maison.

A Dryden, L'express de l'équité a fait un arrêt au Collège Confederation pour bavarder avec les nouveaux diplômés. L'après-midi du 18 juin, le collège tenait sa cérémonie de remise des diplômes et nous sommes arrivés à temps pour parler avec plusieurs diplômés et leurs parents.

Une journée exceptionnelle pour tous ces finissants, avec leurs coiffes et toges, joyeux et prêts à affronter l'avenir. L'optimisme de la jeunesse est important. L’optimisme est l'énergie qui permet à nombre d'entre nous de surmonter l'adversité et de garder espoir dans les plus sombres moments. De nos jours, l'optimisme général est trop souvent mis à mal par les dures réalités d'un marché de l'emploi en plein désarroi et d'une dette insurmontable.

Dans la soirée, l'équipe a fait une halte à proximité d'un terrain de soccer afin de parler de la montée des inégalités de revenus au Canada avec les familles.

Un résident a parlé des difficultés qu'il rencontre pour élever sa famille : « J'élève seul mes enfants et je suis souvent obligé de leur dire qu'il n'y a pas assez d'argent pour acheter toutes les choses qu'ils veulent quand nous sommes à l'épicerie. »

Le 19 juin, le gros autobus vert a passé la journée à la plage de Sioux Lookout. Nous avons rencontré Garnet Angeconeb, un membre de la Première Nation du Lac Seul.

Journaliste et survivant des pensionnats, Garnet a parlé de l'importance de développer une stratégie durable pour favoriser la croissance économique dans les collectivités autochtones du nord, tout en évitant les erreurs du passé.

« Nous ne voulons pas qu'on répète les erreurs du passé. Nous devons tirer les leçons de notre passé collectif », a expliqué Garnet.

Depuis quelques années, on parle beaucoup du potentiel économique du Cercle de feu, une région riche en minéraux, située dans la basse terre de la Baie James. Le Cercle de feu, qui est l'une des régions les plus riches en minéraux de l'Ontario, pourrait être le cœur d'un projet industriel très lucratif. Cependant, le développement de la région aurait un impact significatif sur les neuf communautés des Premières Nations qui vivent sur ce territoire.

« Le développement et l'exploitation des ressources peuvent bénéficier à tous à condition qu'on embarque tout le monde et avance dans la même direction », a ajouté Garnet.

Le 20 juin, l'équipe s'est jointe à la section locale 702 pour une manifestation au Best Western, au centre-ville de Kenora. Les employés s'étaient rassemblés pour soutenir leur équipe de négociation qui poursuivait des négociations contractuelles difficiles avec leur employeur – Firefly.

Firefly est un organisme qui procure des services communautaires (soins physiques, de santé mentale, de développement) aux enfants, jeunes et adultes de la région de Kenora. Il est regrettable que les employés des services de développement figurent parmi les travailleurs les moins bien payés de la province, et les membres de la section locale 702 ne font pas exception.

Dans un élan de solidarité, nous avons garé l'autobus juste en face de l'hôtel Best Western et installé notre tente et machine à pop-corn bien en vue des salles de conférence de l'hôtel. James Clancy, le président national du Syndicat national des employées et employés généraux du secteur public (SNEGSP), était sur place et a parlé avec plusieurs travailleurs qui participaient au rassemblement. À en juger par le nombre de coups klaxons, les résidents de la communauté appuient leurs efforts dans la lutte pour un contrat équitable.

Le jour suivant, le bus a fait étape au parc Anicinabe, à proximité du Lac des Bois, à l'occasion du Festival Little Big. Organisé par le Grand Council Treaty N° 3, le festival vise à célébrer les peuples et les cultures autochtones à l'occasion de la Journée nationale des Autochtones. Nombre d'Autochtones et de résidents de la région s'étaient déplacés pour profiter des festivités, de la nourriture et de la musique.

Nous avons eu l'occasion de discuter avec Leon Jourdain, ancien grand chef du Grand Council Treaty N° 3, qui a accompli deux mandats, et chef de la Première Nation du Lac la Croix. Leon a parlé de l'adversité à laquelle sont confrontés les peuples autochtones du Canada et de leur lutte pour combattre l'injustice et l'inégalité.

« J'ai vu et vécu les inégalités qui ont dévasté l'identité et l'esprit de mon peuple, a raconté Leon. La douleur collective va bien au-delà des mots. Ils pleurent la perte de leur nation. »

Leon a souligné le fait que beaucoup trop de communautés autochtones du Canada vivent dans la pauvreté la plus abjecte – une situation qui est en train de détruire leur avenir.

« Par désespoir, nos enfants, qui ne voient pas la lumière au bout du tunnel, se suicident à un rythme infernal. Le désespoir, la mort… est-ce que c'est l'égalité? On doit revoir tout le système. Nos jeunes meurent et détruisent leur vie. En nous privant de prospérité économique, les gouvernements contribuent à créer une misère sociale. Ils veulent nous faire oublier le sens de nos traités. »

Après huit belles journées dans la Région 7 et sept semaines sur les routes de la province, la tournée de L'express de l'équité en Ontario touchait à sa fin. Mary Cory, membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 7, a déclaré : « L'express de l'équité du SNEGSP a été une expérience unique que je n'oublierai jamais. »

« C'était une excellente occasion de rencontrer des Ontariennes et Ontariens afin de leur parler des questions auxquelles les familles sont confrontées quotidiennement.  Il est important d'écouter ce que les gens ont à dire, de discuter avec eux et de leur expliquer ce qu'on peut faire pour améliorer les choses. Je remonterai à bord de L'express de l'équité sans hésiter une seconde. »

À partir du 26 juin, le gros autobus vert commencera une nouvelle tournée de sept semaines à travers le Manitoba. Une équipe du Syndicat des employés généraux et de la fonction publique du Manitoba montera à bord de L'express de l'équité et prendra le relais.

Un dernier adieu à L'express de l'équité

Nous avons vécu sept semaines extrêmement stimulantes et enrichissantes d'un bout à l'autre de l'Ontario. Nous avons visité plusieurs douzaines de villes et communautés et eu des milliers de conversations sur la montée des inégalités de revenus avec les Ontariennes et Ontariens. À chaque fois, nous avons rencontré des gens formidables qui nous ont raconté des histoires incroyables. Toutefois, nous avons également constaté qu'il y a beaucoup de gens aux prises avec des difficultés en Ontario – beaucoup trop dans une province ayant autant de richesses.

D’un bout à l’autre de la province, nous avons entendu des histoires de déception et de souffrance. Les gens nous ont parlé d'emplois perdus, de collectivités en déclin et de politiques gouvernementales désastreuses. Nombre d'entre eux ont également parlé de la nécessité d'un changement. Ils voient que le système est défaillant et ils veulent que ça change.

Nous avons apporté un message d'espoir et de solidarité et informé les gens afin qu’ils sachent qu'un mouvement de changement est en train de naître.

Un changement qui prend forme peu à peu – une conversation après l'autre et au fur et à mesure où on informe et sensibilise les gens. Au bout du compte, il s'agit de rassembler les Canadiennes et Canadiens pour défendre ce qui est juste et équitable.

Pour en savoir plus sur la campagne, consultez : http://alltogethernow.nupge.ca.

Pour lire le blogue de L'express de l'équité, consultez : http://alltogethernow.nupge.ca/fairness-express.

Rencontrez les activistes

Au cours de ces sept semaines et tout au long de ces 14 000 kilomètres, 35 activistes des sept régions du SEFPO se sont joint à L'express de l'équité. Inspirés par le message de L'express de l'équité, soit l'équité fiscale, de bons emplois, la défense des services publics et des droits du travail, ces activistes ont donné de leur temps et de leur énergie pour discuter de l'impact des inégalités de revenus avec les Ontariennes et les Ontariens et les encourager à œuvrer pour le changement.

Grâce à leur optimisme et enthousiasme contagieux, les activistes ont contribué à créer un fort sentiment de fraternité et d'unité entre tous les membres  qui ont formé un groupe extraordinaire.

Région 1

Len Elliott est membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 1 et inspecteur en santé et sécurité au ministère du Travail à London.  Il est membre du SEFPO depuis plus de 9 ans.

Lisa Fewster est présidente de la section locale 166 et travaille pour Community Living à London.  Première vice-présidente du Conseil de district de London, elle est membre de l'exécutif du Conseil syndical local. Lisa est une militante syndicale dévouée depuis 14 ans.

Jennifer Ganley est la secrétaire de la section locale 148 et travaille pour Community Living dans la municipalité de Chatham-Kent depuis 26 ans.  Elle participe activement aux activités du syndicat depuis 2007. Sa couleur préférée est le vert.

Julie McGuffin est membre de la section locale 102 et résidente de London.

Région 2

Drew Finucane est trésorier de la section locale 219, conseiller en établissement et formateur pour les personnes ayant une déficience visuelle à l'École W. Ross MacDonald, à Brantford.  Il est membre du SEFPO depuis 10 ans et délégué syndical depuis 2 ans.

Karen Gventer est la présidente de la section locale 276 et la représentante en éducation du Secteur 17 du SEFPO (professionnels des soins de santé communautaires).   Elle est également la conseillère en matière de harcèlement et discrimination de la Région 2. Membre du SEFPO depuis 2001, Karen milite activement depuis 2004. Activiste dévouée en faveur de la justice sociale depuis toujours, elle était la candidate du Nouveau Parti démocratique dans la circonscription d’Owen Sound aux élections provinciales.

AnnaMarie Hampton-Alcock est une infirmière auxiliaire autorisée à Lee Manor, à Owen Sound (section locale 299). Déléguée syndicale, elle est activiste et membre du SEFPO depuis 12 ans. Militante syndicale dévouée, elle s’inquiète de la montée des inégalités au Canada.

Lorraine Skitch est présidente de la section locale 221 et vérificatrice dans la Région 2. Elle est co-présidente du Comité d'exécution et du renouvellement de la région Ouest (probation et libération conditionnelle) et du groupe de travail du personnel de soutien. Lorraine est également membre du Comité des relations employées-employeur (probation et libération conditionnelle)  et vice-présidente du Comité de secours régional. Elle est une militante syndicale dévouée du SEFPO depuis 26 ans.

Ryan Walker est le délégué syndical en chef de la section locale 249 et ancien président du Comité provincial des jeunes travailleurs.  Délégué au Conseil du travail de district de Hamilton, il est un dévoué agent des services de développement. Ryan, qui a grandi dans une famille qui s'impliquait dans le mouvement syndical, est membre du SEFPO depuis neuf ans.

Région 3

Angela Bick Rossley est membre de la section locale 303 et technicienne ambulancière dans le comté de Simcoe.  Elle est présidente du Comité provincial des femmes et du Fonds pour la justice sociale. Elle est membre du SEFPO depuis huit ans et déléguée syndicale depuis trois ans.

Bianca Braithwaite-Davis est déléguée syndicale en chef de la section locale 330 et aide-enseignante à l'École publique Regent Park, à Orillia, en Ontario.  Elle est secrétaire du Conseil du travail d'Orillia et directrice des finances du NPD dans la circonscription de Simcoe Nord. Membre du SEFPO depuis 9 ans, elle s'implique dans les activités syndicales depuis deux ans.

Sean Platt est membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 3 et agent des services correctionnels au Centre correctionnel du Centre-Est à Lindsay. Membre du SEFPO depuis 10 ans, il milite activement depuis neuf ans.

Région 4

Hervé Cavanagh est président de la section locale 466 et président du Conseil de district de Rideau/Ottawa. Il est également responsable de la formation et de la communication à la Division des professionnels hospitaliers et président du Conseil du travail de district de Lanark. Physiothérapeute à l'Hôpital du district de Perth et de Smiths Falls, Hervé milite activement dans le mouvement syndical depuis 14 ans.

Chris Cormier est membre du Conseil exécutif du SEFPO et vice-président régional de la Région 4. Conseiller d'encadrement des élèves à Sir James Whitney School for the Deaf, à Belleville, Chris milite activement dans le mouvement syndical depuis 14 ans.

Barb De Roche est présidente de la section locale 443 et de la Division du personnel de soutien des hôpitaux. Elle préside également le Conseil de district de Kingston/Ottawa. Commis dans le service de chirurgie de l'Hôtel Dieu Hospital, à Kingston, Barb s’implique activement dans le mouvement syndical depuis 14 ans.

John Hanson est président de la section locale 416 et membre du Conseil du travail de district d'Ottawa. Marié et père de deux enfants, il est mécanicien de machines fixes au Collège Algonquin à Ottawa. John est un activiste syndical du SEPO depuis sept ans.

Dave Lundy est membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 4. Au même titre que Chris, Dave est très proche des membres de sa région en raison de son leadership et de son engagement.

Ben Treidlinger est président de la section locale 449 et membre du Conseil du travail de district  d'Ottawa. Il est également le sergent d'armes du Conseil du travail de district de Renfrew. Agent du POSPH au ministère des Services sociaux et communautaires, Ben est un militant syndical dévoué depuis 30 ans.

Chrisy Tremblay est présidente de la section locale 454 et représentante du Comité provincial des femmes de la Région 4. Elle est également présidente du Conseil de district d'Ottawa et de la Société d'aide à l'enfance d'Ottawa. Chrisy est agente de soutien à domicile à la Société d'aide à l'enfance d'Ottawa.

Morgen Veres est présidente de la section locale 487 et de la Division des professionnels des soins de santé communautaires et membre de l'Alliance arc-en-ciel. Inspectrice de la santé, Morgen est activiste du SEFPO depuis trois ans.

Région 5

Don Collymore est membre de la section locale 5110 et du comité contre la privatisation de la LBED.  Il travaille à temps plein comme représentant du Service à la clientèle à la Régie des alcools de l'Ontario et il milite activement dans le mouvement syndical depuis deux ans.

Kingsley Kwok est président de la section locale 575 et membre de l'exécutif de la Division des professionnels hospitaliers.  Il est thérapeute respiratoire à l'Hospital de Scarborough et membre du Conseil de district de la région du Grand Toronto. Kingsley est également président de la Coalition de la santé de Scarborough et activiste syndical depuis 11 ans.

Myles Magner est membre du Conseil exécutif du SEFPO et vice-président de la Région 5.

Deborah McGuiness est membre de la section locale 5110 de la LBED.

Ellie Murphy est membre de la section locale 5110 de la LBED.

Vera Tsotsos est présidente de la section locale 581 et travaille dans le service du personnel de soutien à l'Hospital de Scarborough.  Membre du SEFPO depuis 19 ans, Vera s'implique dans le syndicat depuis 13 ans.

Région 6

Catherine Csuzdi est secrétaire/trésorière de la section locale 608 et suppléante au Comité provincial des jeunes travailleurs pour la Région 6.  Étudiante à l'Université Nipissing (programme des techniciens systémiciens), elle est une activiste dévouée du SEFPO depuis quatre ans.

Felicia Fahey est membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 6 et de la Division des employés de la Régie des alcools.  Felicia milite activement dans le mouvement syndical depuis 14 ans.

Janine Johnson est membre retraitée de la région 6 et présidente de la Division des membres retraités et une syndicaliste très respectée.

Région 7

Glen Archer est membre du Conseil exécutif de la région 7 et agent des services correctionnels à la prison de Kenora.

Mary Cory est membre du Conseil exécutif de Région 7 et vice-présidente de la section locale 714.  Au Conseil exécutif, elle assume un rôle de liaison avec le Comité provincial des femmes et le Comité de la justice sociale. Elle est également membre du Comité régional des femmes – « les consœurs de la Région 7 », qui se focalise sur la sensibilisation communautaire dans la Région 7. Agente de présentation des cas au ministère des Services sociaux et communautaires, Mary est membre du SEFPO depuis 22 ans.

Halcea Dobson est secrétaire/trésorière de la section localel 719 et vice-présidente du Conseil du travail de Kenora.  Agente des services correctionnels à la prison de Kenora, elle est membre du SEFPO depuis sept ans.

Elaine Kerr est membre du personnel de soutien des CAAT et travaille au centre d'évaluation à l'emploi au Collège Confederation.  Elle est représentante de la Région 7 au Comité provincial des femmes et également membre du Comité régional des femmes – « les consœurs de la Région 7 », qui se focalise sur la sensibilisation communautaire dans la Région 7.

James Nowe est président de la section locale 719 et agent des services correctionnels à la prison de Kenora. Membre du SEFPO, il est un activiste dévoué depuis 10 ans.

Carl Thibodeau est membre du Conseil exécutif du SEFPO et vice-président de la Région 7.

Semaine riche en événements dans la Région 6

Résumé de la 6e semaine

Le 6 juin, L'express de l'équité a fait étape à North Bay pour sept journées pleines d'activités dans la Région 6. Du 6 au 12 juin, le gros autobus vert a fait escale à North Bay, l'île Manitoulin, Sudbury, Iroquois Falls, Cochrane, Monteith, Kirkland Lake, Timmins, Elliot Lake, Sault Ste. Marie et Wawa.

À North Bay, l'équipe de L'express de l'équité avait rendez-vous avec Felicia Fahey, Catherine Csuzdi et Janine Johnson de la Région 6. Afin de permettre aux membres de faire connaissance, L'express de l'équité a fait un tour des plus illustres monuments de la ville, avec des arrêts au secteur riverain, au Collège Canadore, à l'Université Nipissing et à la célèbre porte d'entrée du Nord, connue comme la « Gateway of the North ».

En fin de matinée, l'équipe de L'express de l'équité a participé à un rassemblement de soutien pour sauver la ligne ferroviaire d'Ontario Northland Railway. L'Ontario Northland Railway assure des services de transport essentiels dans le nord-est de l'Ontario depuis plus d'une centaine d'années, mais le gouvernement de l'Ontario a décidé de réduire le service de transport des voyageurs ces dernières années, puis de se départir totalement de l'Ontario Northland Railway. En avril dernier, le gouvernement est revenu sur sa décision – acceptant de maintenir le service ferroviaire. Toutefois, il y a encore beaucoup d'incertitude autour de l'avenir du transport ferroviaire, et ces travailleurs, qui sont membres d'UNIFOR, s'inquiètent pour leur emploi.

« Quelque huit cents emplois seraient en péril si on venait à supprimer les services ferroviaires, a déclaré un employé de longue date d'Ontario Northland Railway. Une telle perte aurait de graves répercussions sur l'économie locale et sur l'ensemble de la communauté de North Bay qui dépend beaucoup d'Ontario Northland. »

Dans l'après-midi, L'express de l'équité a fait une halte à la baie Providence à l'occasion du Festival de Bluegrass de l'île de Manitoulin. Felicia Fahey, membre du Conseil exécutif du SEFPO, a été invitée sur la scène du festival pour dire quelques mots à propos de la tournée de L'express de l'équité.

« Le gros autobus vert voyage d'un océan à l'autre pour sensibiliser la population au problème croissant des inégalités de revenus au Canada », a déclaré Fahey.

« L'équipe de L'express de l'équité comprend des citoyens ordinaires qui partent à la rencontre d'autres citoyens ordinaires afin de discuter des inégalités de revenus et de leur impact sur la vie quotidienne. Nous sommes convaincus qu'il est temps de lutter pour défendre avec vigueur l'équité fiscale, les bons emplois, les services publics et les droits du travail. »

Le 7 juin, l'autobus vert a pris la direction de Sudbury pour le « Clash du Nord » – le match de football qui opposait les Spartans de Sudbury aux Steelers de Sault Ste. Marie. Le match de football était parrainé par le SEFPO et l'équipe de L'express de l'équité a pu dresser sa tente près de l'entrée et discuter avec de nombreux partisans. Grâce à un excellent travail de l'équipe, de nombreuses personnes ont pris le temps de discuter avec nous. Plusieurs joueurs ont même jeté un œil à nos dépliants avant d'aller se préparer pour le match.

Par contre, notre présence n'a pas suffi à faire gagner les Spartans. Le « Clash du Nord » a surtout été une victoire éclatante pour les Steelers qui ont écrasé les Spartans 65 à 6.

Le jour suivant, l'autobus a mis le cas plus au nord, en direction de Timmins. L'express de l'équité a fait escale au bord du lac Gillies dans la très belle aire de conservation de la région de Mattagami. En discutant avec les résidents du coin, nous avons appris que l'économie de la région est prospère depuis ces dernières années, notamment grâce à l'industrie minière de l'or et au secteur forestier. Toutefois, on nous a également dit que tout le monde ne bénéficie pas du boom économique et que les emplois à temps plein et bien rémunérés sont difficiles à trouver.

Dans la soirée, l'autobus a pris la direction de Cochrane pour visiter le centre de conservation des ours polaires, la gare ferroviaire de Cochrane, d'où part l'Express de l'ours polaire, un service de transport ferroviaire exploité par l'Ontario Northland Railway.

Le 9 juin, l'équipe de L'express de l'équité s'est jointe à la section locale 642 du SEFPO pour un piquetage d'information au Complexe correctionnel de Monteith. Les services publics de l'Ontario sont constamment sous pression et le manque de financement est une réalité quotidienne pour le personnel de l'établissement.

En raison du manque de ressources, la charge de travail du personnel devient intolérable pour les membres du personnel, qui sont pourtant nombreux à craindre de nouvelles compressions à l'avenir.

« Nous voyons ce qui se passe dans les établissements correctionnels de la province, a déclaré un agent correctionnel. Les niveaux de dotation en personnel sont à leur niveau le plus bas; un manque de personnel qui constitue une menace permanente pour notre sécurité à tous. »

Le 11 juin, le gros autobus vert s'est rendu à Elliot Lake et a fait une halte sur le site de l'effondrement du centre commercial qui avait causé la mort de deux personnes en juin 2012. L'une d'entre elles, Lucie Aylwin, 37 ans, était membre du SEFPO et travaillait au Collège Cambrian.  Nous avons bavardé avec une résidente de la communauté qui nous a expliqué qu'on aurait pu éviter cet effondrement.

« J'ai vu des fuites dans de nombreux magasins et chaque fois que j'y allais c'était pareil.  C'est une tragédie qui n'aurait jamais dû se produire. »

Après Elliot Lake, L'express de l'équité a pris la direction de Sault Ste. Marie. Dans la région de Sault-Sainte-Marie, l'autobus a fait une halte au marché Mill sur le secteur riverain. Situé dans les bâtiments de la vieille écloserie, ce marché très dynamique est géré par des personnes très progressistes de la région.  L'équipe s'est installée près de sympathiques commerçants qui vendaient des produits frais de la ferme, des produits de boulangerie-pâtisserie, de l'artisanat autochtone et d'autres articles d'artisanat. Les gens du coin ont répondu avec enthousiasme à notre message et nous ont raconté de nombreuses histoires de personnes qui sont aux prises avec l'accroissement des inégalités de revenus.

La semaine dans la région 6 s'est révélée être une autre réussite pour L'express de l'équité.

« Je tiens à remercier le SNEGSP et le SEFPO pour la visite de L'express de l'équité dans la Région 6 », a déclaré Felicia Fahey, membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 6.

« Grâce au passage de L'express de l'équité, nos membres et nos communautés ont pu voir qu'ils ne sont pas seuls à lutter et qu'il y a des personnes qui sont prêtes à défendre les opprimés. »

À partir du 14 juin, L'express de l'équité sillonnera la Région 7. Si vous êtes dans la région, n'hésitez surtout pas à venir rencontrer les membres de l'équipe!

14 juin – Thunder Bay
Fierté gaie de Thunder Thunder in the Park
11 h à 15 h

15 juin – Thunder Bay
Lac Boulevard
De 9 h à 17 h

16 juin – Atitokan
Bureau de poste
De 10 h à 12 h

17 juin – Fort Frances
Rue Scott
De 10 h à 14 h

18 juin – Dryden
Collège Confederation – Cérémonie de remise des diplômes
De 12 h à 15 h

19 Juin – Sioux Lookout
Plage (barbecue du SEFPO à 17 h)
De 12 h à 19 h

20 Juin – Kenora
Centre de loisirs – Kenora Show
12 h à 17 h

21 Juin – Kenora
Festival Little Big (Terrain de camping et de caravaning Anicinabe)
De 10 h à 16 h

Rencontrez les activistes

Catherine Csuzdi est secrétaire/trésorière de la section locale 608 et suppléante au Comité provincial des jeunes travailleurs pour la Région 6.  Étudiante à l'Université Nipissing (programme des techniciens systémiciens), elle est une activiste dévouée du SEFPO depuis quatre ans.

Felicia Fahey est non seulement membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 6, mais également une fière membre de la Division des employés de la Régie des alcools.  Felicia est une militante syndicale dévouée depuis 14 ans.

Janine Johnson est membre retraitée de la région 6, la présidente de la Division des membres retraités et une syndicaliste très respectée.

 

 

Trois journées bien remplies pour L'express de l'équité dans la Région 5

Le 3 juin, L'express de l'équité a fait étape à Toronto pour trois journées pleines d'activités dans la Région 5. Du 3 au 5 juin, le gros autobus vert a fait escale au parc Downsview, à la Brasserie Molson, au Collège George Brown et à l'Hôpital de Scarborough.

Le mardi matin, l'équipe de L'express de l'équité était au parc Downsview pour parler de la campagne « Je vote »  et de la montée des inégalités de revenus en Ontario avec les membres des sections locales 534, 536 et 542. Myles Magner, membre du Conseil exécutif et vice-président régional, était sur place pour sensibiliser les membres aux enjeux des prochaines élections provinciales.

« Nous avons pensé que le passage de L'express de l'équité dans la région 5 pendant la campagne électorale était une excellente occasion de mobiliser les gens et de les encourager à voter », a déclaré Magner.

L'après-midi, L'express de l'équité était à la Brasserie Molson pour un barbecue en compagnie de quelques centaines de membres de la section locale 325 du Canadian Union of Brewery and General Workers. Warren (Smokey) Thomas, président du SEFPO, a souligné l'importance de la solidarité entre le SEFPO et le Canadian Union of Brewery and General Workers.

« Les travailleurs des brasseries forment un groupe formidable. Honnêtes et durs à la tâche, ils sont conscients des défis auxquels doivent faire face les travailleurs de cette province, a déclaré Thomas. Nous avons déjà fait beaucoup de travail ensemble dans le passé et nous espérons bien continuer à l'avenir. »

Le 4 juin, l'équipe a passé la journée au Collège George Brown pour un barbecue de solidarité organisé par les sections locales des personnels scolaire et de soutien du collège.

L'équipe a eu l'occasion de rencontrer des étudiants et de parler de leur avenir dans un contexte économie de plus en plus difficile. De nombreux étudiants et jeunes adultes sont aux prises avec les mêmes difficultés : un endettement croissant, l'effondrement du marché du travail et un avenir incertain.

Nous avons rencontré un individu qui était à la fois étudiant et employé au collège. Travailler à temps partiel tout en fréquentant un établissement d'enseignement postsecondaire n'est pas une chose nouvelle, mais l'augmentation des frais de scolarité et du coût de la vie constitue un fardeau financier supplémentaire pour de nombreux étudiants. Nombre d'entre eux doivent travailler davantage pour joindre les deux bouts, ce qui a un impact sur leurs études.

Le 5 juin, l'équipe était à l'Hôpital de Scarborough pour rencontrer les membres des sections locales 575 et 581 et parler de l'inégalité des revenus et de l'importance des services publics de qualité.

L'express de l'équité est arrivé à l'heure du déjeuner – le moment idéal pour rencontrer plusieurs dizaines de membres et discuter des sujets qui les préoccupent.

« Les réductions de financement ont un impact direct sur les travailleurs, a déclaré un membre du personnel. Ma journée de travail ne suffit plus et ma charge de travail s'accumule jour après jour.  Il y a une pénurie de personnel et la pression ne cesse de s'accroître sur nous. Nous avons du mal à tenir le coup. »

En dépit de l'ampleur de leurs problèmes, les membres étaient ravis de pouvoir parler de la montée des inégalités de revenus et de l'importance des services publics avec l'équipe de L'express de l'équité.

À partir du 6 juin, L'express de l'équité sillonnera la Région 6. Si vous êtes dans la région, n'hésitez surtout pas à venir rencontrer les membres de l'équipe!

6 juin – baie Providence
Festival de Bluegrass (patinoire de la baie Providence)
De 17 h à 20 h

7 juin – Sudbury
Barbecue de la FPO à l'Holiday Inn
De 11 h à 14 h

7 juin – Sudbury
Match de Football (parrainé par le SEFPO)
 De 17 h à 20 h

8 juin – Timmins
Parc Hollingsworth
De 10 h à 14 h

D'autres activités (dates et heures) à venir

Rencontrez les activistes

Kingsley Kwok est président de la section locale 575 et membre de l'exécutif de la Division des professionnels hospitaliers.  Thérapeute respiratoire à l'Hospital de Scarborough, il est membre du Conseil de district de la région du Grand Toronto. Kingsley est également président de la Coalition de la santé de Scarborough et activiste syndical depuis 11 ans.

Myles Magner est membre du Conseil exécutif du SEFPO et vice-président de la Région 3.

Vera Tsotsos est présidente de la section locale 581 et travaille dans les services de soutien à l'Hospital de Scarborough.  Membre du SEFPO depuis 19 ans, elle s'implique dans le syndicat depuis 13 ans.

Don Colleymore

Debbie McGuinness

Ellie Murphy

Pour de plus amples informations sur la Tournée de l'express de l'équité, consultez le site Web du SNEGSP, All Together Now : http://alltogethernow.nupge.ca/

Pour lire le blogue de L'express de l'équité, consultez http://alltogethernow.nupge.ca/fairness-express

L'express de l'équité de passage au parc Downsview et à la Brasserie Molson

Le 3 juin, L'express de l'équité du Syndicat national des employés généraux du secteur public (SNEGSP) était de passage à Toronto pour une étape au parc Downsview et à la Brasserie Molson.

Le mardi matin, l’équipe de L'express de l'équité était au parc Downsview pour parler de la campagne « Je vote »  et de la montée des inégalités de revenus en Ontario avec les membres des sections locales 534, 536 et 542. Myles Magner, membre du Conseil exécutif et vice-président régional, était sur place pour sensibiliser les membres aux enjeux des prochaines élections provinciales.

« Nous avons pensé que le passage de L'express de l'équité dans la région 5 en pleine campagne électorale était une excellente occasion de mobiliser les gens et de les encourager à voter », a déclaré Magner.

« Nous avons pu aller au-devant de trois sections locales au complexe Downsview et distribuer des dépliants à plusieurs centaines de membres. Les membres ont réagi positivement et se sont montré ouverts à notre message pour défendre des services publics de qualité. »

L'après-midi, L'express de l'équité a fait escale à la Brasserie Molson pour un barbecue en compagnie de quelques centaines de membres de la section locale 325 du Canadian Union of Brewery and General Workers. Warren (Smokey) Thomas, président du SEFPO, qui était sur place, a souligné l'importance de la solidarité entre le SEFPO et le Canadian Union of Brewery and General Workers.

« Les travailleurs des brasseries forment un groupe formidable. Honnêtes et durs à la tâche, ils sont conscients des défis auxquels doivent faire face les travailleurs de cette province, a déclaré Thomas. Nous avons déjà fait beaucoup de travail ensemble dans le passé et nous espérons bien continuer à l'avenir. »

Thomas a également souligné que la campagne de L'express de l'équité est primordiale pour dénoncer la montée des inégalités de revenus au Canada.

« Joindre les deux bouts est de plus en plus difficile, a-t-il ajouté. De nos jours, un abcès dentaire peut être ce qui fait qu'on doit choisir entre payer son loyer et faire son épicerie ou soigner son abcès. »

« La plupart des gens ont compris qu'il y a vraiment un problème; les gens en sont conscients. Grâce à son immense succès, la Tournée de l'express de l'équité permet de mettre en lumière des problèmes qui ont un impact important sur bon nombre d'entre nous. »

Pour de plus amples informations sur la Tournée de l'express de l'équité, consultez le site Web du SNEGSP, All Together Now : http://alltogethernow.nupge.ca/

Pour lire le blogue de L'express de l'équité, consultez : http://alltogethernow.nupge.ca/fairness-express

Semaine mémorable pour L'express de l'équité dans la Région 3

Résumé de la 4e semaine

Mardi 27 mai, par une matinée humide, L'express de l'équité a fait étape à Peterborough pour une semaine pleine d'activités. Du 27 mai au 1er juin, le gros autobus vert s’est rendu à Peterborough, Orillia, Haliburton, Parry Sound et Clarington.

À Peterborough, Sean Platt, membre du Conseil exécutif du SEFPO de la Région 3, ainsi que les membres du SEFPO, Bianca Braithwraite-Davis et Angela Bick Rossley, se sont joints à L'express de l'équité.

Lors du premier arrêt, dans la région 3, l'équipe avait rendez-vous à une clinique privée de Peterborough pour un rassemblement organisé par le Conseil des Canadiens et les coalitions de la santé de Peterborough. Actuellement, la Coalition de la santé de l'Ontario fait une tournée provinciale avec un fauteuil à bascule géant afin de sensibiliser la population aux problèmes des niveaux de soins et de l'accès aux soins dans les établissements de soins de longue durée de la province.

« Il n'y a pas de normes de soins dans les maisons de soins infirmiers en Ontario, a souligné Cathy Carroll du Syndicat international des employés de services. Nous avons besoin de normes plus élevées en matière de soins. »

La Coalition de la santé de l'Ontario exhorte le gouvernement à adopter une norme minimale de dotation en personnel durant quatre heures de soins directs par jour afin que les patients reçoivent les soins qu'ils méritent et vivent dans la dignité.

Dans l'après-midi, l'équipe s'est rendue à l'écluse-ascenseur de Peterborough et au port de plaisance pour discuter des conséquences des inégalités de revenus avec de nombreux résidents de la région.

Le jour suivant, L'express de l'équité a mis le cap sur Orillia et fait escale au secteur riverain et à Weber's Hamburgers.

Bianca Braithwaite-Davis, résidente d'Orillia et membre du SEPO, a parlé de la montée croissante des inégalités de revenus et du déclin de la qualité des services publics avec des gens du coin.

« Je cumule deux emplois, a déclaré Bianca. C'est de plus en plus difficile pour tout le monde de joindre les deux bouts. »

« Nous constatons que les services publics et les bons emplois ne cessent de décliner et nous devons nous unir pour que ça change. »

Dans l'après-midi, l'équipe a reçu la visite de vingt membres de la section locale 325 du Canadian Union of Brewery and General Workers. À Orillia pour participer à une conférence éducative, ils sont venus rencontrer l'équipe de L'express de l'équité pour passer une après-midi dans la bonne humeur – avec du pop-corn et des discussions animées sur la tournée.

Le 29 mai, L'express de l'équité était de retour à Peterborough pour une étape au parc Riverview, au Zoo et au centre commémoratif de Peterborough. À proximité du terrain où les Lakers jouaient une partie de crosse, George Hewison, musicien folk et activiste syndical, s'est joint à l'équipe. Avec sa voix et sa guitare, George a apporté sa note personnelle pour soutenir l'équité fiscale, les bons emplois, les services publics et les droits du travail.

Le matin suivant, le gros autobus vert a pris la direction de la région des chalets et fait escale au parc du lac Head à Haliburton. Le parc, qui est situé au centre-ville de la petite communauté, longe le rivage du lac Head. Nous avons reçu un accueil très chaleureux à Haliburton et les gens étaient très intéressés par notre message.

« Je me souviens des années 1980 quand l'Ontario était en plein essor et qu'il était facile de trouver un bon emploi », a déclaré un résident d'Haliburton.

« De nos jours, il semble que la majorité des gens soient aux prises avec des difficultés. L'année dernière, 135 familles de Haliburton ont eu recours régulièrement à la banque alimentaire. 135 familles dans une communauté de 5 000 personnes! C'est incroyable. »

« Dans cette région, le salaire moyen est de 20 000 $, a ajouté un autre résident. C'est tout simplement inacceptable! »

Le jour suivant, L'express de l'équité s'est rendu à Parry Sound afin de rencontrer des membres du SEFPO et des résidents de la communauté. Plusieurs membres de la section locale 320, y compris sa présidente, Christine Marshall, se sont joints à l'équipe de la tournée. Tout le monde a passé une excellente journée, discutant des inégalités des revenus, de l'équité fiscale et de la qualité des services publics avec les gens de la communauté.

Le 1er juin, l'autobus a pris la direction de Newcastle à l'occasion du Home Show, un événement annuel à Newcastle. Le temps était au beau fixe et les gens du coins se sont montrés très intéressés par notre message.

Ce 1er juin coïncidait avec la première augmentation du salaire minimum en Ontario depuis quatre ans, passant de 10,25 $ à 11 $ l'heure. Plusieurs résidents ont souligné que cette augmentation était une bonne chose, mais qu'il y avait trop de travailleurs qui gagnaient le salaire minimum en Ontario. Angela Bick Rossley, membre et activiste du SEFPO, a précisé que la question du salaire minimum est pour elle un véritable motif de préoccupation.

« En tant que présidente du Comité provincial des femmes, je peux dire que l'inégalité des revenus est un sujet de préoccupation qui revient constamment sur la table. Les femmes représentent plus de 50 pour cent des travailleurs qui gagnent le salaire minimum. Parmi les travailleurs qui gagnent un salaire de misère, les femmes forment un groupe disproportionnée.

Cette semaine dans la Région 3 a donc été un véritable succès. Enchantés par leur semaine dans la Région 3, les membres de la tournée sont convaincus que le message est bien passé.

« Je tiens à remercier tous les membres de la Région 3 qui ont participé à nos activités et passé un moment avec l'équipe de L'express de l'équité », a déclaré Sean Platt, membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 3.

« Le message, concernant l'équité fiscale, les bons emplois, les services publics et les droits du travail, a été très bien reçu par les membres de la Région 3. »

À partir du 3 juin, L'express de l'équité sillonnera la Région 5. Si vous êtes dans la région, n'hésitez surtout pas à venir rencontrer les membres de l'équipe!

3 juin – Toronto
Café avec les sections locales au Parc Downsview
De 7 h à 10 h

3 juin – Toronto
Barbecue à l'usine Molson avec la section locale 325 du SNEGSP
De 13 h à 16 h

4 juin – Toronto
Barbecue au Collège George Brown avec les sections locales de CAAT-A et CAAT-S
De 11 h à 15 h

5 juin – Toronto
Barbecue à l'Hôpital de Scarborough avec la section locale 575
De 11 h à 15 h

Rencontrez les activistes

Angela Bick Rossley est membre de la section locale 303 et technicienne ambulancière dans le comté de Simcoe.  Elle est présidente du Comité provincial des femmes et du Fonds pour la justice sociale. Elle est membre du SEFPO depuis huit ans et déléguée syndicale depuis trois ans.

Bianca Braithwaite-Davis est déléguée syndicale en chef de la section locale 330 et aide-enseignante à l'École publique Regent Park à Orillia, en Ontario.  Elle est secrétaire du Conseil du travail d'Orillia et directrice des finances du NPD dans la circonscription de Simcoe Nord. Membre du SEFPO depuis neuf ans, elle s'implique dans les activités syndicales depuis deux ans.

Sean Platt est membre du Conseil exécutif de la Région 3 et agent des services correctionnels au Centre correctionnel du Centre-Est à Lindsay.  Membre du SEFPO depuis 10 ans, il est un activiste dévoué depuis neuf ans.